Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Quilting Summer 2017



I am a Craftsy Affiliate. Please support the show by using the link in the sidebar to access Craftsy. Thank you!



Craftsy fabric for backing...Colonial Manor (4 yd cut). Link in sidebar.
Jelly Roll for Quilt: Moda Bonnie and Camille "Hello Dolly"
Connecting Threads Little Leaves Basic and Little Dots
American Patchwork and Quilting--tip for numbering rotary cutter blades.

Quilt As You Go by Jera Brandvig.

Blog and etsy shop: Red Pepper Quilts

etsy shops that carry Japanese Fabric Lecien
Donna's Lavender Nest
Sew Me a Song



Thursday, July 20, 2017

#14 Knitting Pipeline Extra

Quilting is a separate episode to be published shortly. Photos from Iceland trip are at the end of the episode.

Thank you to KnitCircus yarns for sponsoring this episode.

Enjoy 10% off your order at www.knitcircus.com through July 2017 with code PIPELINE



To enter the drawing for two matching cakes of KnitCircus Greatest of Ease in the Turquoise Pool color way visit the Knitting Pipeline Group on Ravelry and leave a comment in the KnitCircus Giveaway Thread.




FO's


  • Lucy Gloves by Dawn Catanzaro using Quince & Co Chickadee
  • Georgetown by Hannah Fettig in Quince & Co Owl
  • Socks in Snail Yarn
  • Hat with Icelandic Yarn from Thingborg


WIPS

  • Mother Bears for The Mother Bear Project and the 2KnitLitChicks Mother Bear KAL
  • Annabel Babe Cardigan by Carrie Bostick Hoge


Compression Bags from amazon.com.

HomeIdeas 8 Packs Space Saver Portable Compressed Storage Bags, Simple Roll-up Zipper Packing Organizer Bags, No Vacuum Seal, PREMIUM QUALITY, Perfect for Home and Travel.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Episode 286 Gloves...Be Not Afraid

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.
Quince & Co  brings you responsibly sourced wool and plant fibers: wool, linen, and cotton. Find us at Quince and Co dot com.
Visit the Knitting Pipeline Ravelry Group to enter into a drawing for this matching cake set of KnitCircus Greatest of Ease!

KnitCircus Giveaway Thread on Ravelry!
Knitcircus Yarns specializes in hand-dyed gradients and gradient stripes. For the month of July we are offering a special to Knitting Pipeline listeners. Enjoy 10% off anything in our online store. Use the coupon code PIPELINE. Find at www.knitcircus.com and be sure to join our Ravelry group and listen to our podcast.
Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Craftsy offers affordable online classes that are yours forever. When you use the link in the sidebar on my blog before purchasing a class or supplies I receive a small percentage of your purchase at no extra cost to you. Thank you!
You can also find me here:
Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.
Instagram: knittingpipeline
Twitter: knittingline
This episode includes Pipeliner Notes, Events, Nature Notes, Needle Notes, and in the Blethering Room.
Pipeliner Notes
Thank you to everyone who has been in touch with me. Welcome to new Pipeliners: manadabomb whi is Amanda from Indiana., nmaushak who is Nancy in NM, and Liz who is Liz in Maine.
Thank you for your five star ratings and reviews on iTunes.
From Brassband who is Patricia from Dedham MA
I have enjoyed finding books and travel information about Iceland and looking at Icelandic patterns for knits. So happy you had a wonderful trip without problems. I am reading a book now, Windows of Brimnes by Biill Holm, who is a wonderful American Icelandic man who died in 2009. Holm was a frequent guest on Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie “Home Companion” radio show, and some of his poems were included in Keillor’s “Writer’s Almanac.” He was a fanatic about Iceland and so interesting.
My question is did you travel to his Icelandic home in Hofsos? He has permanent home in Minnesoda as well. Another question, do the sheep and cattle look different in Iceland, behavior or physical characteristics? Is the wool different in any way?
I know next to nothing about cattle--reminded me somewhat of Highland Cows of Scotland. The milk cows at the farm hotel looked like Jerseys. There are small Icelandic horses.
Icelandic Sheep
Raised for meat. Sheep industry accounts for 1/3 of Icelandic economy.One of oldest and purest breeds in the world, descended from Norwegian sheep brought to Iceland around 900 AD. No sheep have been imported into Iceland so they can keep the breed pure. May look quite different within the breed.
  • Wool is dual coat. ƥel is the softer undercoat.
  • Tog is the long coarse outer coat. Tog is a true wool not guard hair.
  • Ƥ is called thorn.
  • Icelandic Sheep were brought to North America in 1985 (Canada) and all Icelandic sheep in North America come from these.
  • Sheep are hardy and can withstand cold. Graze in harsh conditions.
  • Without the Icelandic sheep, Icelanders probably would not have survived over the centuries.
  • Rams is an Icelandic film on Netflix.
Fleece and Fiber Sourcebook by Deborah Robson and Carol Ekarius
From Tessa from Edmonton, Alberta CA
I listen to a lot of true crime podcasts, so yours is a needed break in between to lighten things up!
I can’t help but message you about this - you mention a couple of times in the early podcasts that you’ve used circular needles to knit flat. The way it was worded, it sounded as though you were using two sets of circular needles with stoppers on the end to knit back and forth on to each needle - is this really how you do it? I use circular needles for flats fairly regularly, but I knit back and forth on the same circular needle and it seems very intuitive and easy to keep my work on. Surely this is what you meant? Using two full corded needles sounds so cumbersome, I can’t even imagine. I used this method on the baby Norwegian sweater I did, I should have done it in the round but I’m a new knitter and didn’t yet feel confident in altering the pattern. Anyway, I used a 80cm circular to knit back and forth and it didn’t seem too horrible. Forgive me if I completely misunderstood you and this comment is super obvious.
Thanks again!
You have the idea, Tessa. You can use one circular needle to knit flat or you can use two circular needles with stoppers. The reason for the latter is that you might have a lot of stitches on the needle which can be difficult to push along the cord.
Events
Giveaway thread: KnitCircus Greatest of Ease Sock Set
PIPELINE is discount code for 10% off through July.  Leave a comment in the giveaway thread.
Registration started for Eagle Crest Retreat. November 8-11.—starting to process.
Threads Hope and Love
Nature Notes
North Carolina wildlife was fantastic!

Our lizard friend visiting at the kitchen window.

Needle Notes
What got the ball rolling in Iceland…I fell in love with Angie’s gloves.
Lucy Gloves by Dawn Catanzaro
  • My first pair! For so many years I’ve been put off by the idea of knitting gloves…all those fingers!
  • Very comfortable with dpn’s and magic loop but I would say that for gloves, dpn’s definitely my choice.
  • I was thinking I should not wear them that much so they don’t wear out but the fingers would be so easy to replace compared to mittens.
  • Knit them in 4 days!
  • Cabling without a cable needle also a handy skill for this project.
    I used Quince & Co Chickadee in the Leek color way.
More gloves In the Pipeline: Free pattern is Knotty Gloves by Julia Mueller
Do you have any favorite glove patterns?
From DC Alaneknits
I’ve made only 2 flat bears. I didn’t like the sewing. You could try in the round next time. With your experience, it would be a simple leap. You can make it top down or bottom up.
I’d encourage everyone to try a bear. The need is great! She has sent 135,000 and I think she said she needs 19million!
Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.


Friday, July 7, 2017

Episode 285 Georgetown


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

Quince & Co  brings you responsibly sourced wool and plant fibers: wool, linen, and cotton. Find us at Quince and Co dot com.

Knitcircus Yarns specializes in hand-dyed gradients and gradient stripes. For the month of July we are offering a special to Knitting Pipeline listeners. Enjoy 10% off anything in our online store. Use the coupon code PIPELINE. Find at www.knitcircus.com and be sure to join our Ravelry group and listen to our podcast.


Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Craftsy offers affordable online classes that are yours forever. When you use the link in the sidebar on my blog before purchasing a class or supplies I receive a small percentage of your purchase at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




If you’ve been on the board recently you might have read that our son in NC was in a bad bicycling accident on Father’s Day. We drove down to help them out during his surgery and recovery.


It wasn't all cooking. We had lots of reading and playing time.


Pipeliner Notes

Thank you to everyone who has been in touch with me.
I appreciate your five star ratings and reviews on iTunes.
From Diane Scitchr.
For both car and plane knitting, I like projects that are small, light, and easy. I’d rather not have to look at a lot of instructions or a chart. Socks are ok, but I use DPNs, and sometimes they get dropped, which is especially awkward on a plane. I prefer fingering weight projects, because they’re not heavy or bulky.

Something like a sockhead hat is perfect if I want to have something in my hands, but have my full attention on the scenery and the company.

From Kathy KisforKnitting

Finally had a chance to catch up on episodes.

For travel knitting, I carry on something reasonably compact and uncomplicated but pack something(s) that take up more space and/or has more complexity for when I get there. It can be a shawl, cowl, hat, socks, anything as long as it fits the criteria. Car knitting is not an option because I am usually the one driving; as far as I know there is no knitting mindless enough to do while driving.

One time a man sitting next to me not only took up the armrests but started sticking his elbows over the armrests and into my space. I pulled out my knitting and--although I knit continental with pretty subdued movements--I exaggerated my movements and knit with a flourish. Raising my elbows and bumping his “incidentally” while I knit delivered a message without exchanging confrontational words. He withdrew his arms and the remainder of the flight was more comfortable. Since then, I always carry knitting on board.

From Knitnaround Patty in WI

I do my charity knitting on road trips. I knit baby hats, sweaters, bibs and blankets for local hospitals. They are usually pretty simple patterns and I use washable yarns, nothing too fancy. I don’t fly much, but when I do, I usually just read as I find it too confining in those seats to knit.

Amusing show this time!

Events

Registration started for Eagle Crest Retreat. November 8-11.  Registration information in previous blog post and in Ravelry groups.


Threads Hope and Love

Nature Notes

(I wrote this in June before our trip to NC.)

June weather is glorious. For the most part we are having cool nights and warm days, mostly in the 80’s although we had some 90’s in there too. We moved our thistle feeder away from the deck to lesson some of the mess, which that move did accomplish. Bob hung the tube feeder from a branch of one of the maple trees but it took the finches a while to find it and then they didn’t like it. Bob figured out that perhaps the seed was either stale or damp so he bought new seed and now the goldfinches seem happier. Hummingbirds are regular visitors and they also like sipping at the oriole nectar feeder that hangs nearby. We haven’t seen orioles yet although we continue to put out orange halves, grape jelly, and sugar water.  Our nesting pair of Rose breasted Grosbeaks are back this year. We mostly see the handsome male in the evenings when we have dinner on the deck.

Our house wrens have set up their nest in the wooden bird house right outside the porch window. The male sings all day long, which we love. We are also enjoying the wood thrushes as they call back and forth. For a while in May they were singing at all times of day. It sounded like wood thrush “surround sound” with their melodic trills coming from several directions. No matter how many times I hear the wood thrush, each time evokes a bit of magic into the air. Speaking of magic, rain and thunderstorms followed by sunshine this week produced rainbows, even a double rainbow. I didn’t get photos but I did see photos on Facebook.

We had crop failure with our zinnia bed. We plant the Thumbelina variety and they always grow a lot bigger than the seed packet predictions. We reseeded the bed and now have seedlings making their way up through the warmed earth. It will be interesting to see if these zinnias bloom by mid-July.

Yesterday was midsummer. I tried to find a good midsummer poem but they were rather depressing as none of us really want to think of the slow march to shorter days.

Summer has filled her veins with light and her heart is washed with noon. --C. Day Lewis


Needle Notes

 
Georgetown on (a pregnant) Emily

Georgetown by Hannah Fettig

Mother Bears






Mother Bears waiting to be sewn and stuffed.




Product Notes and Giveaway!




The Blethering Room

Breakfast with Sara

The Yarnery

The Yarnery "Pop" wall


Surprise visitor--Linda!
The Yarnery

Gnome Acres House Gnome   Ophie’s Popsicles colorway

Pop Sock


Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Episode 284 Eagle Crest Retreat 2017


Knitting Pipeline Eagle Crest Fall Retreat 2017
November 8-11, 2017


Eagle Crest Camp and Retreat Center (A Ministry of the Salvation Army) is located in rural Washburn IL, along the hilly bluffs of the Illinois River. Eagle Crest is easily accessible by car, about a 30 min drive from Washington IL or Peoria. The address is 823 Columbia Rd, Washburn IL 61570.
·         Arrive Wednesday November 8, 2017 (check in time 3-5 PM)
·         Check out by 10 am Saturday, November 11, 2017.

Single Occupancy             $420.00
Double Occupancy (will have your own bed)       $320.00

Includes:
·         3 nights lodging in Heartland Lodge at Eagle Crest. Rooms are motel-style with private bath.
·         All meals from Wednesday dinner through Saturday breakfast. (working on improving menus).
·         Small, intimate retreat with lots of one-on-one time/
·         Your own Knitting Pipeline Retreat Bag

Hosted by Paula Emons-Fuessle
Paulaef@aol.com                            PrairiePiper on Ravelry

To Register:
·         Fill out the registration form and postmark no earlier than Friday, July 7, 2017. Registrations will be accepted after this time pending space availability. I will confirm registration by email and on Ravelry by July 20, 2017. Deposits are due August  15, 2017.
·         Full payment is due by October 15, 2017. Checks may not be cashed immediately so don't worry if your check has not cleared.

Please make check out to Paula Emons-Fuessle. Mail registration (page 3 only) and payment to Knitting Pipeline, PO Box 549, Washington IL 61571

Cancellation Policy
·         All registrations include a $50 deposit.
·         If you cancel before October 15, 2017 then I will refund your retreat registration less a $50 deposit.
·         After October 15, 2017 refunds are on a case by case basis depending upon what expenses can be recovered, whether your place can be filled, etc. I understand that things happen and will do what I can to refund your money.












Notes:


·         The closest airport is General Wayne A Downing International Airport (Peoria=PIA). I recommend flying in on Tuesday unless you rent a car and can drive yourself to Eagle Crest.
·         Wednesday morning and early afternoon will be a great time to visit Washington IL and our local yarn shops. Or stay later on Saturday if you like.
·         Special dietary requests are not accommodated at Eagle Crest; however, there are selections at each meal.
·         If you are staying over before or after the retreat, I recommend Sleep Inn.
Sleep Inn 1101 N Cummings Lane, Washington IL 61571 (309) 481-0450
·         If you have a knitting related- business please contact me about vending or know a vendor, please let me know.

·         The dining hall and meeting area are about a 10-15 minute walk from the Heartland Lodge Rooms so you may want to drive. Other than that, everything is very close and all on one level. If you don't have a car, there are plenty of us who can give you a ride.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Episode 283 Iceland…Wool Fire and Ice

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

Quince & Co  brings you responsibly sourced wool and plant fibers: wool, linen, and cotton. Find us at Quince and Co dot com.

Knitcircus Yarns specializes in hand-dyed gradients and gradient stripes. We are always exploring new and inventive colorways.  Find at www.knitcircus.com and be sure to join our Ravelry group and listen to our podcast.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Craftsy offers affordable online classes that are yours forever. When you use the link in the sidebar before purchasing a class or supplies I receive a small percentage of your purchase at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




This episode is about my recent trip to Iceland with some wonderful Pipeliners and new friends. There were 20 of us wool-minded travelers and we had a blast. We will have Pipeliner Notes, Nature Notes, Needle Notes, and of course, In The Blethering Room. Feel free to ask questions!

 So let’s jump right in!

Pipeliner Notes

Thank you to everyone who has been in touch with me.

Goalma who is Karol with a K from NJ, Angie in Louisiana, Morningthaw who is Kay from NE, ThePeekocrafter who is Aimee in Ireland, hookinggood who is Sherry in CA, Colletteknits who is Collette in Toronto, teaandknittingtoo from Cincinnatti, agziller who is annalia from Atwater CA, honeypottree who is Georgina in the UK, Jaime McCorry who is a piper with Midlothian Pipe Band in Chicago and a new knitter, Caroux who is Liz from the UK now living in SW france, honeymarit, and woolercoaster who is Christine from Toronto.

I appreciate your five star ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Nature Notes

Iceland is a dramatic country with volcanos, lava fields, geysirs, mountains, waterfalls, and wool!


We arrived at the airport, which is about a 40 min drive from the capital city of Reykjavik. The airport is basically in a lava field. It’s hard to imagine how any life could be sustained on these rocks. Our first stop was the Blue Lagoon. I had read that the Blue Lagoon is too touristy, but it was the highlight for several travelers and a great way to refresh oneself after a long journey. If you go to Iceland, do make reservations at the Blue Lagoon. The Blue Lagoon is basically a giant hot tub fed by natural geothermal springs which are found across the country of Iceland. We changed into bathing suits and ventured out into the 40 degree weather to the lagoon. You walk down a slippery ramp, hanging onto the hand rail and into the hot water which was heavenly. There is a natural silicon sediment which you can feel on the bottom of the lagoon. It was the perfect setting to get to know one another and compare travel notes. We waded over to a facial bar so we could get globs of silica to smear on our faces. After washing that off we could get a free mud mask from a guy who knew how to work the crowd or pay to get an algae mask. It was all good and great fun. We were there about 3 hours, had a bite of lunch, and then hopped our bus for the hotel.

Our hotel was centrally located on the main walking street of Reykjavik, close to shops, including a grocery store called Bonus, which is a bit like an Aldi.

Our first outing was called the Saga Circle Tour. Our first stop was at the dye workshop of Gudrun Bjarnedottir. Gudrun is a biologist at the nearby agricultural college. She uses natural dyes, most of which she gathers from nature, to dye Icelandic wool. The colors were so gorgeous and I succumbed to a shawl kit with 6 colors and added in a 50 g skein of a natural color in case I want to add a border.


We then went to our second geothermal experience only this time we weren’t getting into the water because it was literally boiling up from the earth. There were caution signs HAETTA! And safety cones to keep people away. Meanwhile it was quite cold and windy. If you saw some of my photos on Instagram, you know that it was a chilly time there. The temperatures were in the 40’s at night and up into the 50’s in the daytime with wind and rain. It didn’t rain hard when we were there but there were days when there was a pretty constant, light rain. Actually, we were fortunate with the rain because it always seemed to rain the most when we were in the bus or in a building. Also it was light 24/7! Hotels had blackout curtains.

We visited a lot of waterfalls on the day trips that we took and each one had its own personality. The first one was Barnafosser…I think. You could spend weeks in Iceland and not get to all the waterfalls. There was snow still on the mountains. The mountains reminded me of the Scottish Highlands as they are quite barren of vegetation…mostly moss and lichen. They have a stark beauty that was quite breathtaking.




Needle Notes


Did we see wool in grocery stores or convenience stores? No, but other than the Bonus we weren’t in grocery stores much. You do see wool, mainly Lopi, in all kinds of stores along the Laugavegur and other streets in the city. There are a lot of shops that carry Icelandic products, souvenirs and Lopi was in all of these. Lopi is pretty much the only inexpensive item in Iceland. It’s about 3.50 to 4.00 per ball. There are so many gorgeous colors that were so tempting…I had intended to get a sweater’s worth for my husband, but I ended up getting an assortment of fall inspired colors for hats and mittens. I actually purchased most of the lopi at Alafoss when we visited on Monday.

Alafoss is considered the heart of the wool industry in Iceland. The Istex mill is where all the wool is processed. A lot of us bought wool there and some purchased gorgeous sweaters.
We made a dent in the wool in the Alafoss Store.

Lopapeysa (Lopi + Sweater) are the Icelandic Sweaters that are practically an icon for Iceland. If you are not familiar with them, the body of the sweater is usually a natural color, sometimes with some stranded color work on the bottom of the sleeves and above the ribbing and then there is stranded color work in the yoke. We learned that these sweaters were actually created for the tourism industry in the 1950’s but now Icelanders wear them also so they have become part of Icelandic tradition but they don’t go that far back.

Silverbell/Angie

Nordic Wind by CabinFour Informal KAL


The Blethering Room
Thingvellir National Park

Thingvellir

Thingvellir Plain



On the third day of our trip we were headed for the Farm Hotel called Efstidalur but not before seeing several magnificent sites. This day was possibly the highlight for me because we went to the Thingvellir National Park. Ever since I read the Icelandic sagas (not all of them) during my college days, I’ve wanted to visit this place. This is the plain where Icelanders met to settle disputes and matters of law starting around 930 AD and ending around 1798. It is considered the first Parliament of the world. It wasn’t exactly as I had imagined because I had always thought of it as a flat plain, which part of it is, intersected by bodies of water. I have to admit I got a bit teary when I thought about the history of this place.

There is a flag pole with the Icelandic Flag on a high rock which may have been what they called the Law Rock, or Lögbjerg.
The Law Rock

The lead-up to the adoption of Christianity is well described in Njáls Saga:

"The following day both sides went to the Lögberg, and Christians as well as heathens named witnesses and denounced each others laws and regulations. Then there arose such a tumult at the Lögberg that no one could hear what anyone else said."

There is a waterfall here as well. It pours into what is called the drowning pool where women accused of adultery were drowned. What happened to the men? Nothing.
Waterfall into the Drowning Pool




I was at Thingvellir!

Linda, Barb, Paula, Debbie

 What I didn’t know is that it is an important geological site as well. This is where two tectonic plates, the North American and the Eurasian plates meet. Tectonic plates (a term that was new to me) are sections of the earth’s mantle that are constantly shifting due to the heat in the earth’s core. You can see the large chasm formed by the plates. This is the only place in the world where you can see the intersection of plates as most of these are below sea level and/or in the ocean.

Iceland Tectonic Plates

Geysir Georthermal Area

Our word geyser comes from Icelandic Geysir which means gusher.

The Great Geysir stopped erupting but 100 meters south of it is…

Strokkur Geysir (Strokkur means “churn”) erupts every 6 to 9 minutes. How many times has it erupted since we were there?
Waiting for Strokkur to erupt
Strokkur starting to erupt


Full Eruption of Strokkur





















Farm Hotel Efstidalur


Ice cream parlor with their own homemade ice cream from their own cows. The parlor has windows so you can see into the barn where the cows are. We made use of the ice cream parlor. The food there was fantastic! Both are dinners there were included and they were delicious. They do local meat, fish, and produce as much as they can.

Off to see Eva's sheep!



Newborn lamb gets some love from Mama

Karen, Sarah, and I went on a walk and one of the hotel workers was roping off an area behind the barn…

Later that afternoon was the day the cows were let out of the barn for the first time after being in there all winter. How could we get so lucky? We saw a lamb being born and the cows dancing—all in one day!

One of our sunny days at Efstidalur.
One day at Efstidalur was sunny and warm enough to sit outside and knit in the sun.



On way back to Reykjavik from Efstidalur we Visited Open Air Museum and several lovely yarn shops Amma Mus, Storkurinn, and Litla Prjonabudin.

The following day we spent the day in Reykhavik at the studio of Helene Magnusson. She showed us  a lot of her designs and samples and then we did a small sample of a traditional Icelandic shawl called Hyma, which is pretty much a standard triangular shawl.
This lady always has a smile on her face!







After the workshop some local knitters came to mingle and knit with us. They brought some of their Show and Tell which was fabulous. Added to our queues.

Last scheduled tour was the South Shore Tour. Visited a yarn shop called Thingborg which had yarn that was their own blends, handpicked lambswool.

Waterfalls, Black sand beach.






Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

--Robert Frost

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close!

About Me

My photo
I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.