Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Episode 311 Happy 8th Podiversary


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.


Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Craftsy offers affordable online classes and supplies. When you use the link in the sidebar before purchasing I receive a small percentage of your purchase at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Show notes are found at www.knittingpipeline.com. You can find me on Ravelry as PrairiePiper and on Instagram and YouTube as KnittingPipeline. There are two groups on Ravelry, Knitting Pipeline and Knitting Pipeline Retreats. Come join us there!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Pipeliner Notes

Note about videocast…you may not have received notification from past two episodes even if you are a subscriber.

Thank you to everyone for supporting the podcast for the past 8 years! I could not do it without you.

Welcome to our newest Pipeliners who have said hello to us on the Welcome thread or to me in a personal message. AnnSoutter from Buffalo Grove IL. Remember to introduce yourself in the Welcome thread if you are new so I can recognize you on the show.

Thank you for your star ratings and reviews on iTunes. New review from Paulsmom12503!

Events

Links to retreats and registration materials are in the Knitting Pipeline Retreats Group on Ravelry. There is also a sticky thread with all upcoming retreat dates.

Eagle Crest Retreat Registration is open. Just a few spots left. Attendees have been posted on Ravelry.

Trip to Ireland in May 2019. Will be a separate episode AND blog post so subscribe to both.

Mittens for Maine (and Eagle Crest) Mary of Knitting Dish podcast.

Needle Notes
Reiko by Melanie Berg for Quince & Co Shawls 4

Detail of Reiko


Points on right side are the bind off. Loved it!

Reiko by Melanie Berg for Quince & Co Shawls 4

Seven Sisters Arts Zenith in Lodestar. Gorgeous yarn!

This shawl is pure joy to knit! The pattern is beautifully written. I would love to make another one in Quince & Co Piper.

Crazy Eights Dishcloth by Julia Tarsha (Simply Notable)

Nature Notes


·        Stopped feeding except for Goldfinches and hummingbirds. Water feature

·        Wrens singing most of the time.

·        Bluebirds

·        Garden looks good!

·        Japanese beetles are back.

·        Swallowtail in garden. Red Spotted Purple on hike. Doe and fawn.

Just living is not enough. One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower. --H. C. Andersen, The Complete Fairy Tales. (The Butterfly)

In The Pipeline

Knitting

Odette Hoodie by Carrie Bostick Hoge (knitting as pullover instead of cardigan.)

Galiano Socks by Tracie Millar

Making

Quilting

Baby Kisses by Jenny Doan. For Helene’s 3rd birthday. Shown in Video Extra #21



Mouse House doll quilt by Amy Sinibaldi from Sweetly Stitched Handmades.

Grandmother’s Fan Quilt sent to Grace and Peace Quilting.

Wooden Stool by Papa. It is a small version of the stool he made from the Craftsy Class.
Papa made for the 3rd birthday
Top of stool with joins




Information from Lisa who is Turbogal.

Hi Paula,
As always, I really enjoyed your episode. I love to hear about the knitting, also also the nature notes (I get to compare to see how different Minnesota is from Illinois!).

I listened to your yogurt making segment with interest. I studied dairy science, and am a yogurt maker by profession (I’ve worked for a well known yogurt company for more than 20 years). You are so right that yogurt is easy to make at home, and I’m always excited to hear about people making it themselves, because they really see what an amazing fermentation process it is. I have a couple of comments which might add to the discussion.

You said you thought the only reason dry milk was in your sister’s recipe was to save money. I don’t know her recipe, but I always tell people that to make good yogurt you have to add milk to milk. Adding extra milk powder (or condensed milk) to liquid milk makes a yogurt with a thicker texture and better body (less watery tasting). Using a milk with at least some fat will also give the yogurt better body.

You also talked about the difference between Greek yogurt and regular yogurt. There is no legal definition of Greek yogurt, and if you travel the world it means different things in different places. In the US, Greek yogurt is generally thought of as yogurt that is higher protein because it the yogurt is strained to remove liquid - that concentrates it (which increases the protein and the fat if is has fat), and makes it thicker.

You mentioned not moving the yogurt during fermentation, which is very important. If the curd is stirred or even jostled too much you won’t get the nice, smooth yogurt texture. During the fermentation, the proteins form a network, like a net that traps water, but if it is jostled, the net won’t stay nice and open, and able to trap the water.

You talked about how the temperature is pretty forgiving. That is true, but, if you want to have consistent results both the temperature and the culture you use are very important. Yogurt culture is actually two different bacteria, and they each have a slightly different temperature preference, so shifts in temperature will favor one over another. One of the cultures is more tolerant of acid than the other, and so more growth by that culture that will make the yogurt more sour. There are “cheese cultures” that grow at room temperature, used to make products like fromage frais, which is also delicious.

You talked about leaving the yogurt for 8 hrs. That is a good rule of thumb for the home yogurt maker (the best way is to measure pH exactly, but most people can’t do that at home!). It is true that the longer you let it ferment, the more sour it gets. But, how sour it gets (and what flavors it develops) also very much depends on the culture you use and how it grows. What you use for culture makes a big impact, so I recommend using fresh culture each time you start (not like sourdough, where you use the last batch to culture the next batch).

One other thing that I like to tell people about yogurt: One way to minimize the liquid whey that appears when you have a partially used container of yogurt, just use your spoon to smooth out the surface of the yogurt after you have dipped out what you need. This will really minimize the separation (called synersis). If you do see separation, there’s no need to pour it off. Just stir it in!

This ended up being quite long - I am so passionate about yogurt! It is fun to hear about people making it at home. Thanks for sharing it on your podcast.

…What you are doing is using fresh starter, because the culture you add should be the same every time you make a batch, if you always use the same culture source. The cultures should still be live and active well beyond the code date on your commercial yogurt, but they will grow more vigorously the “younger” the yogurt is. Not using fresh starter would be: saving some of the yogurt you made and using it to culture your next batch. The possible problem with that is since home yogurt making is not very controlled, the ratio of the two cultures will probably be different each time.
Thank you, Lisa!

Friday, June 29, 2018

#21 Knitting Pipeline Video Extra



Quilting starts at 15:00.

PrairiePiper on Ravelry
knittingpipeline on Instagram

Knitting

  • Mason-Dixon Knitting Retreat Shakerag
  • Close to You by Justyma Lorkowska
  • Leading Men Fiber Arts Show Stealer Cherry Blossoms color way
  • Tchaikovsky Hat by CuriousHandmade/Helen Stewart (not Nutcracker Hat--I misspoke)
  • Comfort Fade Cardi (WIP)
  • Reiko Shawl by Melanie Berg (finished but not shown)


Quilting (15:00)

  • Baby Kisses by Missouri Star Quilt Co
  • Magic Genie Bobbin Washers by Supreme Slider
  • Sweetly Stitched Handmades by Amy Sinibaldi
  • Mouse House Quilt


Graceandpeacequilting

Thanks for watching!

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Episode 310 Shakerag, Making Yogurt



Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.
Beautiful Tennessee


Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Craftsy offers affordable online classes and supplies. When you use the link in the sidebar before purchasing I receive a small percentage of your purchase at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Show notes are found at www.knittingpipeline.com. You can find me on Ravelry as PrairiePiper and on Instagram and YouTube as KnittingPipeline. There are two groups on Ravelry, Knitting Pipeline and Knitting Pipeline Retreats. Come join us there!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Note: We had audio issues when my husband and I were recording so you will have to turn the volume up. There is no music at the end or anything else that will disturb your ears.

Pipeliner Notes

Welcome to our newest Pipeliners who have said hello to us on the Welcome thread or to me in a personal message. Lin from Alabama, coffiv, AdiTurbo who is Adi in Israel, yarnsmithdori who is Dori in OH, and WeeSewnSew who is Caz from the Highlands of Scotland. She is the host of the Wee Sew and Sew Podcast on YouTube that I shared with all of you in an earlier episode. Remember to introduce yourself in the Welcome thread if you are new so I can recognize you on the show.

Thank you for your star ratings and reviews on iTunes. New review from TheFibersmith”.

Events

Links to retreats and registration materials are in the Knitting Pipeline Retreats Group on Ravelry. There is also a sticky thread with all upcoming retreat dates.

Eagle Crest Retreat Registration is open. 

Mittens for Maine (and Eagle Crest) idea from Mary of The Knitting Dish podcast.

Needle Notes


Tchaikovsky Hat by Helen Stewart/CuriousHandmade

Malabrigo Silky Merino (purchased at Klose Knit in Urbana IL) in Ravelry Red

The twisted rib and simple stitch pattern make this classic hat a cut above the rest. I did not do a test swatch and the adult large size turned out to be an adult medium, or maybe small. It will fit someone. Delightful design, as expected.

Close to you by Justyna Lorkowska

·        Inspired by Martha Knitcrit

·        Asymmetrical triangle

·        Simple lace. Remember after the first time. Not too picky on stitch counts. Use garter ridges to count rows.

·        Great retreat, travel, or tv knitting.

·        Leading Men Fiber Arts Show Stealer Cherry Blossoms colorway.

Finished two projects and needed something to knit on the way home. Started another Close to You with a sock blank. A sock blank, for those who may be unfamiliar, is a knitted piece of fabric that has been dyed. Usually there is a pattern or gradient…I have never used a sock blank so I bought this one from Gale’s Art at the Knitting Pipeline Georgia Retreat in 2017. Beautiful rainbow sock blank and it seemed perfect for another Close to You. This was my travel home knitting. The only other project I brought with me was mittens for Maine and it seemed too hot to knit mittens. So, I found out that I don’t really enjoy knitting from a sock blank. The kinkiness of the yarn isn’t too bad but I didn’t like the looks of the knitting. This will of course, no be so wrinkly when it is washed and blocked but it just wasn’t pleasing to me.

The flight from Nashville to Chicago is only an hour and then a short layover and a very short trip to Peoria; however, if you follow me on Instagram you might have seen that the trip was a lot longer than planned, as in 20 hours delayed. We made it to Chicago via Kansas City so a one hour flight was 2 hours and then we sat on the tarmac for an hour waiting to deplane. Then the Peoria flight was postponed multiple times and eventually cancelled around midnight. Back to the sock blank. Cot area had fluorescent lights at full blast so I tried using the sock blank as an eye mask. So I wasn’t only stranded but I was stranded without good knitting! Usually I take more than one project with me on the plane “just in case” and the one time I needed it, I did not!

Comfort Fade Cardi by Andrea Mowry. Uses DK weight. Double Finch. Top down cardigan. 


Blethering Room
Missy, Angie, Paula, Dianne
Mason-Dixon Knitting  Ann Shayne, Kaye Gardiner. Loads of amazing contributors.
Mason-Dixon Shakerag.
Farm to table healthful food choices. Happy hour 5 pm. Historic dining hall looked like Hogwarts. Food inspired me to put more thought and time into food preparation.
4 classes and some activities to choose from. I took Photography with Gale Zucker.  Dr. Fix-it with Julia Farwell-Clay. Crochet with Liz Kaplan, Natural Dyeing with Catharine Ellis.
Sat outside in the shade. Knitterati were attending too! Kirsten Kapur, Ann Budd.
Enjoyed spending time with long time listeners, Jan and Jean.


Dining Hall with yummy food!



Making Yogurt


Our original recipe from 1975 in my sister's handwriting. You do not need much to make this version. If you don't want to use instant powdered milk (which we believe was simply to save money) use regular milk for all the liquid, which looks like a total of 6 cups.

1975 recipe for yogurt

back of recipe card.

I used several recipes to come up with our version. This one is most like what we do.

Here's our version. (Also available in Pages in right side bar)

Easy Creamy Yogurt in Instant Pot 

By Paula Emons-Fuessle, Knitting Pipeline 

In our experience, making yogurt is a lot like baking breadIt is fairly forgiving and although it takes a while, the hands-on time is not that great. You simply have to attend to it periodicallyWe made yogurt for the first time 43 years ago. We first made it in a big jar on top of a radiator and also made it in a warm oven. Later we had a yogurt maker that made 5 cups. All of these methods worked fine. We've never had a batch fail completely although we've had some that weren't as good as others. All the Instant-Pot (electric pressure cooker) batches have been excellent. The basic process is to mix milk with a small amount of yogurt and keep it warm for at least 8 hours in a dark place. Don’t move or shake it. 
This recipe is for a half gallon of yogurt which is right for us. You can easily double. 

Ingredients: 
  • Half Gallon of high quality milk. We use whole milk, but you choose. 
  • 1/4 cup high quality plain Greek Yogurt. Must have active culture. 

Utensils: 
Electric Pressure Cooker, 1/4 cup measure, thermometer (we use digital instant read probe), whisk, spoon. We use all stainless steel or glass utensils. 


  1. Put 2 cups water in pot. Lock lid and valve. Push "Steam" button. Set for 2 min. When finished, drain water from pot. Meanwhile, boil water to sterilize thermometer, whisk, and measuring cup. 
  2. Pour milk into pot and press "Yogurt". Adjust until it says "boil". Turn valve so there is no pressure. Takes about 15 min. Take pot out of pressure cooker for the cool down process. Cool to 110° F/43.33 C. We set our probe for 110° and it beeps when it reaches that temperature. Usually 25 min for us. (See note below.) 
  3. If there is a skin on the milk, lift it off with the sterilized spoon. 
  4. Add 1/4 C starter yogurt. Mix in with spoon. 
  5. Return pot to pressure cooker. Push "Adjust". Set for 8 to 24 hours for fermentation. We like 8 hours. Longer fermentation will make the yogurt acidic and more lactose will be digested by the culture.  Pot will beep when time is up.
  6. Whisk the yogurt. We like ours just the way it is with no straining out of the whey. We pour it into a glass container and refrigerate. 
NoteIf you don't have a thermometer, cool the milk until it is a little warmer than body temperature. Test on your wrist as you would for a baby bottle or bath. Recently I was in a hurry and forgot to cool down the yogurt to 110° F. I put the culture into much hotter milk. The yogurt turned out fine. While this is not recommended, it shows that the process is fairly forgiving. 


Friday, June 1, 2018

Eagle Crest Retreat 2018 Information



Listen here to Episode 309


November 7-10, 2018

 (Wed afternoon to Sat morning)


Eagle Crest Camp and Retreat Center (A Ministry of the Salvation Army) is located in rural Washburn IL, along the hilly bluffs of the Illinois River. Eagle Crest is easily accessible by car, about a 30 min drive from Washington IL or Peoria. The address is 823 Columbia Rd, Washburn IL 61570.

·        Arrive Wednesday November 7, 2018 (check in time 3-5 PM)

·        Check out by 10 am Saturday, November 10, 2018.



Single Occupancy            $430.00

Double Occupancy (will have your own bed)               $330.00

$200 for commuters



Includes:

·        3 nights lodging in Heartland Lodge at Eagle Crest. Rooms are simple motel-style with private bath.

·        All meals from Wednesday dinner through Saturday breakfast.

·        Small, intimate retreat with lots of one-on-one time.

·        Your own Knitting Pipeline Retreat Bag.



Hosted by Paula Emons-Fuessle


Paulaef@aol.com                           PrairiePiper on Ravelry



To Register:

·        Fill out the registration form and postmark no earlier than Friday, June 15, 2018 along with a check for $100. (This is a departure from previous retreat sign ups).

·        Registrations will be accepted after this pending space availability. I will confirm registration by email and on Ravelry by July 6.

·        Full payment is due by October 15, 2018 or you may pay in full at time of registration. Checks may not be cashed immediately so don't worry if your check has not cleared.



Please make check out to Paula Emons-Fuessle. Mail registration (page 3 only) and payment to Knitting Pipeline, PO Box 549, Washington IL 61571



Cancellation Policy

·        All registrations include a $50 non-refundable deposit. That is half of your initial deposit of $100.

·        If you cancel before October 15, 2018 then I will refund your retreat registration less a $50 deposit.

·        After October 15, 2018 refunds are on a case by case basis, dependent upon what expenses can be recovered, whether your place can be filled, etc. I understand that things happen and will do what I can to refund your money.


Notes:


·        The closest airport is General Wayne A Downing International Airport (Peoria=PIA). I recommend flying in on Tuesday unless you rent a car and can drive yourself to Eagle Crest.

·        Wednesday morning and early afternoon will be a great time to visit Washington IL and our local yarn shops. Or stay later on Saturday if you like.

·        Special dietary requests are not accommodated at Eagle Crest; however, there are selections at each meal. Meals are served buffet style.

·        If you are staying over before or after the retreat, I recommend Sleep Inn.

Sleep Inn 1101 N Cummings Lane, Washington IL 61571 (309) 481-0450

·        If you have a knitting related- business, please contact me about vending, please let me know.

·        The dining hall and meeting area are about a 15 minute walk from the Heartland Lodge Rooms so most of us drive to and from the lodge rooms. Other than that, everything is very close and all on one level. If you don't have a car, there are plenty of us who can give you a ride to the lodge.

This is our third year at Eagle Crest and I look forward to another wonderful and relaxing retreat!

Haste ye back!

Paula



Yarn Shops in our area include the following supporters of Knitting Pipeline Retreats:

·        The Fiber Universe, Peoria IL

·        Le Mouton Rouge Knittery, Bloomington IL

·        Klose Knit, Urbana IL



About Me

My photo
I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.