Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Episode 260 Iceland Tour 2017!

I am so excited to announce that, along with Amy Detjen,  I am hosting a Knitters' Tour of Iceland in 2017!  The trip is organized by Celtic Journeys. Registration is now open for the tour. There are only 18 spots so don't delay.

Download the Iceland information and registration form here.

Episode 260 is all about the tour.

Some highlights:

May 26-June 5, 2017

3 nights in Reykjavik at Hotel Alda. Full breakfast every morning. Blue Lagoon and welcome dinner first night, Saga Circle Tour, natural dyer Gudrun Bjarnedottier, wool shops, Istex Mill and Alafoss (Lopi), optional Whale watching tour.

2 nights at Farmhotel Efstidalur. Golden Circle Tour of sights, Thingvellir National Park, gorgeous views from our country hotel, visit to sheep farm and time with local Icelandic knitters.

4 nights Hotel Alda: Open Air Folk Museum, Icelandic shawl workshop with Helene Magnusson in her studio, South Shore Tour.

I hope you travel with us!

Paula




Friday, September 16, 2016

#8 Knitting Pipeline Extra

This episode has 2 shawls, both by Helen Stewart, fingerless mitts, mittens, and a couple of sweaters on their way to the frog pond.

Quilting content starts at 43 min. My quilt in progress is Blue Lagoon from Jelly Roll Quilts by Pam and Nicky Lintott.


Please feel free to post questions and/or comments on YouTube or here below. It is easier to answer questions on YouTube.


Thursday, September 8, 2016

Episode 259 Little Leaves and Mittens

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co  all our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA.  Our natural fibers wool, linen, alpaca, and mohair are not chemically treated or mixed with petrochemical fibers such as nylon. Enjoy springy goodness in your knitting with www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.


Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. We are hosting a Pick Your Gradient Shawl KAL through September 2016.  www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. If you visit the link in the sidebar prior to purchasing a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Pipeliner Notes

Thanks to everyone who has been in touch with me in the past few weeks. A special thank you and welcome to new Pipeliners who have introduced yourselves in the Welcome Thread.

As always thank you also for the 5 star ratings and reviews on iTunes. Thank you to Babsknits17 for the most recent new review.


From NellyFenwick in Muncie IN

Just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed the video on the quilted table runner. There wasn’t any thread for it in Ravelry so I thought I’d send a message.

You always inspire me. The runner seems more ‘wintery’ than ‘Christmasy’. I think you could easily use it well into January or February. Now if you could just inspire me to get the weeding done….

You mentioned near the very end that you were getting knots in your thread when you were hand sewing. I think I may know the answer to that one. My mother taught me that it is in the twist inherit to the thread and to always keep the end from nearest to the spool nearest to the needle. Also too, every 10 stitches or so, roll your needle a bit between your fingers to help take any other extra twist out that you may be creating in your thread. Any knots caused by the twist will usually come out easily if you insert the tip of your needle into the loop of the knot to hold it still while gently pulling the needle end of the thread.

Thank you again for your inspiration and being so generous as to share what you are crafting.

From Fiddlesticks2

Hi Paula I just love your podcasts! I am listening from the beginning, and am on show #7, and I would like to see the show notes, but I can’t seem to find them that far back. Can you direct me to the url for the beginning show notes?

Also a little tip if no one has suggested it. I like to put my patterns in the clear sleeves to be put into notebooks. When I am using the pattern, I use white board markers to highlight my progress and make notes. When I am done, this wipes off fairly easy.

Thank you for a great podcast!

From RamonaFireHorse who wrote a lovely letter…this was just at the end of it.

…I was wondering if you had any future plans for another Craftsy-along or a Quince-along. I have sooooo many Craftsy classes where I have not taken the time to make the projects to learn the technique.

Thank you again so much for creating the podcast. I really appreciate you.

With much gratitude,
Ramona

From Trustitches (Trudi)

Picot edging

Good afternoon Paula,
I loved your newest completed shawl from Helen’s Shawl Society. Slowly but surely I’m getting through them.
Could you please explain how you keep the points of the picot edging ‘pointy’? Do you use wire blocking and also pin each picot out?
Thank you so much for all of your inspiration.
Kind regards,
Trudi

I block with pins only on the first blocking. I don’t have blocking wires. On subsequent blockings I rarely pin them out and they still look like picot but not quite so orderly.

From Cori who is irocknits.

Hi Paula . . . a question for in depth examination

So I love your podcast and often you will put out a myth for folks to debunk so here’s my latest query.
Does it really “hurt” your yarn to cake it up for weeks, months or years before actually knitting with it? Years ago, my knitting mentor, and local yarn guru here, used to tell me, “never wrap your yarn balls too tightly, if you drop them from a height of 8-10 inches off the table, they should not bounce.” Makes sense, right? Don’t stretch and pull and wrap your yarn too tightly. HOWEVER, with the advent of yarn swifts and the proliferation of ball winders it seems to me that if you “cake” a skein of yarn up, it certainly hasn’t been given a stress test in it’s journey to a center pull ball and therefore isn’t going to be harmed by a rest on your shelf for say, a year or two. What’s your take? (and your listeners as well). I have heard several podcasters make reference to only caking up yarn immediately prior to knitting, which in my world, completely slows down the process, if I’ve got to stop and go wind yarn in the middle of a project. I’ve even heard of knitters who re-skein yarn from a cake and “no one got no time for that!” LOL A sister in the knitterhood, Cori

I’ve heard this too and I usually dismiss it. I wanted to think about it for a few weeks before responding. And also do a little research. The Principles of Knitting by June Hemmons Hiatt did not say anything about it that I could find. I believe that if the cake is wound properly without straining the yarn then there is nothing to worry about. I’m not even certain you would have something to worry about if the yarn were wound too tightly. In my experience, wool yarn, tends to want to go back to its natural state. If you have ever tried stretching a sweater or another garment that is knit to proper gauge and keeping it there…you may have found it is not so easy to do. Shawls that are knit at a loose gauge are another story. Let’s give wool credit for its resilience and strength.

Let’s hear what the Pipeliners have to say and thank you, Cori, for the question.

Events

Hannah Fettig of KnitBot

Hannah sent me a Farm Spin Dye Knit T-Shirt and samples of the gorgeous yarn.

I’m so excited to announce that Hannah will be vending and signing books at the Knitting Pipeline Maine Retreat! She will be there on Tuesday afternoon during our vendor fair.

Knitting Pipeline Maine Retreat “Getting to Know you” thread. Please chime in if you are going to the Maine Retreat.

Nature Notes

My husband is the hummingbird whisperer. He takes the feeder in at night to keep it out of the hands of raccoons and then he takes it out in the morning. The hummingbirds come out to him immediately and start feeding while he still has the feeder in his hand. I have to get a video of this! The air is filled with hummers most of the day. I can look out into the trees and see them zipping back and forth. The juveniles are out and on their own now. Soon they will be migrating south for the winter.

We have had a bountiful tomato harvest from our two plants. I highly recommend the heirloom variety Caspian Pink. We have grown it before and it is our favorite tomato. The other plant, Boxcar Willie, is not that distinctive or special. We are planning on sticking with Caspian Pink next year. The tomatoes are HUGE, firm, and delicious. They are great for slicing as there isn’t a lot of liquid in them…unlike Boxcar Willie. One day I noticed a very large tomato hornworm Manduca quinquemaculata on the Caspian Pink and it had obviously been eating tomato leaves. Tomato hornworms are bit fat green caterpillars. They are the larval stage of the sphinx moth also called hummingbird moth. This one was unusual though as it was studded with what looked like grains of white rice. I came inside and looked it up online and found right away that the white “grains” were eggs of the Braconid wasp that will kill the hornworm. It is a good practice to leave both hornworm and the wasp eggs as future wasps will also take care of other garden pests. I showed my husband and we both agreed that we just couldn’t leave that horrible hornworm there and I let him deal with it. Now every morning he patrols the two plants and he has found a few more. I don’t ask what he does with them.

I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees. I am going to close my eyes and listen. Anne Lamott.


Needle Notes


Mittens using Brown Sheep










Little Leaves by Alana Dakos




Quince & Co Lark

Madeleine Tosh

The Blethering Room

WIP Wrangling

From Woolyeyes

Instead of actually physically frogging projects, I spent time this week digitally frogging projects. I had 47 WIPS on Ravelry. 47. Not counting the vanilla socks I’ve never started project pages for. I went through the project pages and either marked them as Hibernating (I may want to work on them one day) or Frogged (I never really started them or I definitely won’t be finishing them).

Then I put the active projects in project bags and put them in a basket where I can see them in my living room, ready to be worked on. And then put a bag in my pocketbook for when I’m having lunch at work or waiting for my daughter. It’s a small start but at least I only have 25 in my project pages now!

From Annie97

Great topic!

I still use your old Project Zero plan, Paula! But, about a year ago I realized that I somehow had 16 WIPs in various stages of not-quite-done. Then I realized that it wasn’t just WIPs, it was books and other projects, and it really bothered me - I felt like I had picked up a bad habit of not finishing what I had started, so I used my blog, and made a page where I have been tracking all the WIPs to at least have a handle on them.

I’m down to two now from that original Big List (full disclosure: I actually have four WIPs, but two of them were not on the original list - I’ve been knitting other things throughout the year or I’d be done by now :-D). I looked at all of the WIPs and made the Frog/Finish decision. Some just needed blocking, some were frogged, and the rest I have been plugging away at over time. I’m really jazzed that I’m down to two WIPs (Quick Sand and Rhiannon Socks). Quick Sand has my attention at the moment - the Rhiannon Socks will be the last of the original WIPs from the Big List.

I’m more of a monogamous knitter so I’ve usually chosen one of the WIPs on my original big list to work on along with whatever current project I have going. I work on just the selected WIP until it’s done (blocked). Then I take a victory lap, chose another WIP, and the process starts over :-D Like you, I generally have what I call train knitting, which is easily portable and is usually whatever socks I’m working on.

For me, casting on all the things equates to too many African violets - all of a sudden it’s not fun anymore, and I’ve discovered that I really do not enjoy having to spend substantial time just trying to figure out where I was on a WIP project that I let sit - sometimes for years.

Angelus Novus by East London Knits/Rene Callahan: Hip Hip Hooray for my Rowing Out Progress!

Giveaway! 

For Over The Moon Book and Sweet Degrees of Thanks Collection Notecards





Written and illustrated by M. Paula Survilla

To enter to win a copy leave a comment in the Over The Moon thread on Ravelry (not on the blog or on the episode thread.) Tell us who you would read this book to.

I am not planning on shipping overseas because the book is an odd size and somewhat heavy. If you live abroad I will gift you patterns of your choice on Ravelry. That leads me to a question. My sister’s young grandchildren have moved to Poland—with their parents of course! She recently went to UPS to send a care package to them. It weighed 4.8 lb and the price to send it via UPS was $300. She didn’t send it. If you have any ideas about how she can ship to Poland please let me know. She is so upset. Any ideas?

In the Piping Circle

Waukesha Games


I met Clair! Congratulations to Clair and her daughter Beth on their solo competition 1st and to their band Dundee Scottish for 2nd place in Grade V.
Celtic Cross Pipes and Drums in the competition circle at Waukesha



El Paso Corn Festival Parade on September 10.

9/11 Memorial Walk and Service

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Episode 258 Asana Shawl and WIP Wrangling

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co  all our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA.  Our natural fibers wool, linen, alpaca, and mohair are not chemically treated or mixed with petrochemical fibers such as nylon. Enjoy springy goodness in your knitting with www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.


Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. We are hosting a Pick Your Gradient Shawl KAL through September 2016.  www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. Please click on the link in the sidebar to visit Craftsy. When you purchase a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline





Events

Welcome to new Moderator, TheaMidnight!

KnitCircus Shawl KAL


Retreat dates and status of retreat registrations are listed in a sticky thread in the Knitting Pipeline Retreats group.

Nature Notes

We are having a good morning of thunderstorms and heavy rain today. Our area is under a flash flood warning. Our creek is overflowing its banks and the rain gardens are full and not really able to handle the excess water. My husband created rain gardens to slow down the flow of water during heavy rains and help prevent erosion down the hill. A rain garden is basically a shallow wide hole that can fill up with rain water and slowly drain. You can add plants to it so the root systems help hold the dirt and sand in place too.

Butterflies have been busy on the zinnia bed out front. We aren’t seeing the larger butterflies as much now—giant swallowtail, pipevine, spicebush, and black. We still have Eastern Tiger Swallowtails. I started putting together a little video to help me remember how to identify the different swallowtails that resemble the black swallowtail, mainly pipevine and spicebush and female tiger swallowtail. At first glance you might think all of these are the black swallowtail. My camera lens kept fogging up whenever I went outside to film so I started keeping it in the garage. I need a video to remember myself as I always feel rusty at the beginning of butterfly season.

Yesterday I saw, for the first time at this house, a cloudless sulpher. This is almost twice the size of an orange or yellow sulpher and it has a lime green cast to it’s wings. You will  notice right away that it is larger than the usual yellow butterflies. I did get a pretty good photo so I will post it in the blog but it is hard to understand the size when there is nothing to compare it to. We also have loads of silver spotted skippers, various small skippers, painted ladies, Tiger swallowtail and finally…monarchs. I’ve been very concerned about the monarchs. Last summer the numbers seemed to be up but when it is the end of August and we have not seen any in the garden, I am concerned.

August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time. --Sylvia Plath


Needle Notes


Asana Shawl by Helen Stewart 3rd in The Shawl Society Collection




Seven Sisters Arts Matrika (merino/silk) 2 skeins

The Blethering Room

WIP Wrangling

From KatyKittyJay

I’ve been less enthused by my knitting recently. I’m trying to finish projects because I have too many wips for comfort and never complete anything because my time is divided between so many, and some are big, and others are at the fiddly tedious stage before completion. I think this is why I’m not enjoying it so much, although I’m still knitting every day just not that much and not feeling excited about it.

I didn’t think you could have too many wips but this system is not working for me. Knitting is meant to be fun!

From TheaMidnight

Unfun WIPs can endanger your knitting mojo, so you must guard against that. I look at my WIPs and I question 1) Does the knitting /finishing involve more than I am willing to commit?; 2) Will I still love the piece/garment when I am finished?;
3) How can I reward myself along the way or make this task seem happier until I am done?

Without seeming too philosophical, I am only going to do knitting which I really enjoy. Part of this means forgiving myself for a bad purchase (What was I thinking? LoL!) and being GUILT FREE! I am refusing to punish myself for not finishing and for moving onto another project with a different challenge! There I guess that was some philosophy!

Have the most fun you can with your knitting and don’t let those WIPs drag you under! Move on to knitting you love!

Angelus Novus by East London Knits/Rene Callahan


Quince & Co Phoebe in the Mercury colorway.

Finished body and one sleeve. Sleeve too tight and body too short. I did get gauge and checked gauge several times throughout but did not check row gauge which is probably key in this design.

There comes a time in most projects where you have to power through a section that might not be your favorite type of knitting but I find it is better to do it when you get to it than start something else and try to come back to it. It generally won’t be more fun then.

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Episode 257 Amulet Shawl

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.




At Quince & Co  all our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA.  Our natural fibers wool, linen, alpaca, and mohair are not chemically treated or mixed with petrochemical fibers such as nylon. Enjoy springy goodness in your knitting with www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.

Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. We are hosting a Pick Your Gradient Shawl KAL in August and September.  www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. Please use the link in the sidebar before visiting Craftsy to purchase supplies or classes. Thank you!

You can find me on Ravelry as PrairiePiper and on Instagram as KnittingPipeline. There are two groups on Ravelry, Knitting Pipeline and Knitting Pipeline Retreats. Come join us there!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Pipeliner Notes

From Dayartist who is Jennie

This is for the listener who wrote in with the question about finding projects for yarns already in possession. Something I’ve done is to knit a swatch of the yarn first in order to find a gauge that I like with the particular yarn. Then I use the advanced pattern search, and scroll down to (or jump to) the More Search Options box, and click Gauge 4 inch. Enter your gauge, or a gauge range, and you can find patterns that will match.

From GramCyn

HI Paula and everyone,
I always enjoy your podcasts. Rarely get to the forums but need to comment on the issue of using different weight yarns than patterns call for. Sarah Peasely addresses this in her Craftsy class, Getting Gauge, toward the end. You will learn how to alter the pattern for use of a different weight yarn by using a little math. I have the good fortune to live in the same locale as she does so have taken several classes with her one of which is getting gauge. Check it out.
Cindy


Events

Knitting Pipeline Ravellenics Team! Lead by TheaMidnight. Thank you, Thea!

KnitCircus Shawl KAL Pick a Shawl KAL

Upcoming Retreats…(Registration not yet open)

Washington IL Retreat Feb 17-18, 2017 (Fri 2 PM to Sat 4 PM)

Georgia Retreat April 2-6, 2017 (Sunday to Wednesday)

Nature Notes

Dendrophile=a person who loves trees. (Posted in the Prairie Girls Knit and Spin Podcast group.)

From PrairiePoet

I too enjoyed the nature notes about special trees. Growing up further west (in Nebraska) we have fewer trees. I remember visiting a local apple orchard when I was a child and thinking it a magical place. The trees grew in rows and they produced such tasty crisp apples. I was also reminded of Willa Cather’s passage in My Antonia about how few trees there were on the prairie. The early white settlers visited the few trees and felt anxious about them because they were so few and far between. Of course, Cather’s words are much more beautiful than mine but your nature notes brought the passage to mind.

From Muddy Moose

I always enjoy your nature notes segment and this episode was no different. Growing up in Alaska, we don’t have a wide variety of trees at all, at least that are native to the area. Mostly spruce and birch trees, not very exciting. I love to see other trees when I travel. It is so neat to see pictures of places in the fall, we have nothing like that here really.

One time when we were out hiking with the kids on a windy day we saw a tree fall in the woods. It was pretty neat, once I realized it wasn’t a bear, and counted all the heads and made sure everyone was accounted for. I had never seen that before, it almost happened in slow motion.

From Tejedora

I always love your nature notes. I grew up in northern Virginia, lived in New York State, and now reside in central Virginia and have always been surrounded by beautiful trees. In New York we had a gorgeous blue Spruce in our backyard and a lilac tree that filled the yard with a wonderful scent. In Virginia we have tall pines and some very large oak trees. I have always loved the oak even after a huge White Oak fell on our house last year during a storm and did quite a bit of damage. While we didn’t see it fall we heard the slow creaking as it came toward and landed on our roof. Everything is repaired now and I still love the remaining oaks.
I’m a continental knitter too and am working to standardize my purl stitches as well. It’s an uphill battle.
Thanks, Paula, I look forward to your podcasts.


from Aizome

One of my favorite trees while living in Japan, was the gingko tree. They turn gold the first week of December. It was breathtaking to see entire avenues lined with golden trees. DD2 would gather up a bundle of these mini golden fans, tie them together with some string and bring them home from kindergarten.

When we travel to California to visit family, we always admire the almond trees. They’re planted in such a way that no matter what angle you look at them from, the rows are soldier straight, whether one is looking at them at a 90 degree angle, 60 degree, 45 degree, 30 degree angle, etc. It’s really amazing how they are lined up.

From JoAnna Spring

This episode was such a delight!! The whirlygigs on maple trees are called samaras. I remember this because, as soon as we learned the name in dendrology class, half the girls determined right then and there that Samara would be the name of their first daughter. (20 years later, however, I haven’t seen any birth announcements with the name…)

I hope your summer has been wonderful! Thank you, so, so much for sharing your tree stories with us.


Needle Notes


Amulet Shawl by Helen Stewart








Beads from Gilding Lillies

I used crochet hook method. I like beads but not too many.

Men’s Socks-size 12






I used Knit Picks Shine Worsted in Serrano colorway. 165 yds.

Bebe wearing her Lemon Chiffon.


Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Disappearing 9 Patch Table Runner Video Blog

This video is about making a table runner using the Disappearing Nine Patch. I used the technique from The Missouri Star Quilt Company tutorial to make the block. The episode shows some of the decisions I made along the way as well as some mistakes. I hope you enjoy and perhaps learn a few tips. This is a beginner friendly project although it is not a step by step tutorial.

Knitters! I'll be back soon with an audio knitting podcast!


I used a Charm Pack from Moda called Winter Song by Holly Taylor. 

Saturday, July 30, 2016

#7 Knitting Pipeline Extra

For knitting references please visit the blog posts for Episodes 255 and 256. All projects are in Ravelry where I am Prairie Piper.



Quilting

Peddler's Way Quilt Co, Washington IL

Missouri Star Quilt Company

Block Magazine

4 Patch Star Stars Quilt Tutorial

Disappearing 9 Patch Tutorial

Jera Brandvig Quilt As You Go

Kansas Troubles

Mass Drop

Grace and Peace Quilting (Long Arm Quilting Service)

Welcome Wagon Jelly Roll

Patchwork Loves Embroidery by Gail Pam

About Me

My photo
I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.