Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

# 6 Knitting Pipeline Extra



Thank you so much for joining me. I will be sharing my knitting and also quilting.

Sans Serif by Elizabeth Doherty in Quince & Co Lark. Dogwood colorway

Calligraphy Cardigan by Hannah Fettig from Home and Away. Quince & Co Chickadee Leek Colorway.

Mignon by Loop. 2 Guys Yarn Co in Plum Majesty. MCN Collection DK

Lemon Chiffon by Taiga Hilliard in Frog Tree Picoboo purchased at WEBS last October on way to Rhinebeck.

Box of Socks—7 pair

Dancing Dog Dyeworks Socks

Products

Lollipop Yarn gift from Jo

Night Owl Fibers (Rachel Paulsel)

Flock and Needle Merino gift from Sue Witkin

Hue Loco Phyllis Fingering gift from Cydnie

From Our Flock Abbey of Regina Laudis from Irene. Shetland Wool from sheep raised and cared for at the Abbey.





Quilting

Letter from Jenny Fish

New Block Magazine

The quilt is based on Cutting Corners by Jenny Doan of the Missouri Star Quilt Co. I used Tim Holtz Eclectic Elements. It is available from Craftsy. Please use the link in the sidebar as I am a Craftsy affiliate and receive a small commission if you visit and purchase a class or supplies.
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Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Episode 252 Calligraphy Cardigan


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.


At Quince & Co all of our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA..quinceandco.com. Looking for a fiber for summer knitting? Try our linen yarns, Sparrow and Kestrel or Willet, Cleaner Cotton. All are found at www.quinceandco.com

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.

Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. Our gradients work up into beautiful and satisfying projects.  No need to escape to the moon for some calm; just try Sea of Tranquility Panoramic Gradient a peaceful and lovely color that transitions from Moony-yellows to soft gray to sea blues. Only at www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. Please use the link in the sidebar before visiting Craftsy so I receive credit for your purchase of classes or supplies. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline






Pipeliner Notes

From Suemwitkin

HI Paula. I’ve gradually become aware of a “yarn” situation which is a problem for me. I’m wondering if you’ve had this happen, and if so, how you handle it.
Sometimes (often!) I buy yarn at a festival, shop, or retreat because I have fallen in love with it. When I get home, I have trouble pairing the yarn with a pattern. Often the yarn-weight does not correlate with the pattern I want to use. (Even when the yarn says fingering, and that is what the pattern calls for.) Sometimes I try to use the yarn anyway, and when it says “use needles to get correct gauge,” my knitting seems too tight or too loose at the gauge measeurement. I get stuck here. I can’t figure out if I should knit at the gauge that seems right for the yarn, and make my garment either too small or too big, (or try to adjust the size,) or forego that yarn, and try for a better yarn/pattern match.


I dont’ want to be locked into only using the yarns that are specified for patterns, but I seem to be accumulating yarns I have problems using. Do I just love these yarns as they sit in my stash until I find appropriate patterns? Or are there other options? What do you think, Paula? Have you come across this in your knitting? All the best. Sue

·        I’m getting better. I try to have a list before I go to a fair, retreat, or festival but I also allow myself at least one Wild Card.

·        Often the yarn doesn’t work out for the project. Use Ravelry advanced search to see if something else fits your yarn or what others have done with it.

·        Even when you have the yarn called for in the pattern it is not a guarantee that you will get gauge.

·        Rule for dk worsted and up: Buy 2-3 skeins.

From Branwynnmay

Hi Paula~
I’ve read a couple dozen books on knitting techniques now and have noticed that they seem to be divided on the topic of how to do a W&T- particularly, if the yarn is brought to the front before or after slipping that next stitch. Is this a small, unimportant detail? It seems like not much really is in making a perfectly-finished project, so I thought I’d ask you. There are so many short row methods- what’s your favorite? Thanks for the consistently wonderful podcast! :)


Carol Feller Craftsy Classes

Short Rows by Carol Feller free (Use link in sidebar, please)

Short Row Techniques by Carol Feller (Use link in sidebar, please)

Knit Scene Handmade (Article by Bristol Ivy)

·        German Short Rows

·        Wrap and Turn

·        Japanese Short Rows (Bristol’s favorite)

·        Shadow Wraps—least visible from the front

Events

Stitches Midwest! Join us!

Actually Knitting PALKAL

CuriousHandmade The Shawl Society

Knitting Pipeline Eagle Crest Fall Retreat 2016
With Workshop by Amy Detjen, Knitting Author, Designer, Teacher, and of KnitCircus Yarns and Podcast
October 19-22, 2016

Eagle Crest Camp and Retreat Center (A Ministry of the Salvation Army) is located in rural Washburn IL, along the hilly bluffs of the Illinois River. This beautiful natural setting will be especially gorgeous in mid-October, our prime color season in Central Illinois. It is easily accessible by car, about a 30 min drive from Washington IL or Peoria. The address is 823 Columbia Rd, Washburn IL 61570.

·        Arrive Wednesday October 19 (check in time 3-5 PM)

·        Check out by 10 am Saturday, October 22, 2016

Nature Notes

Today I’m writing about trees. Jenni from The Lone Larch Podcast had a giveaway on her podcast and as the prompt she asked, “What is your favorite tree?” What a great question. I started thinking a lot about trees and not only species of trees but specific trees that have played a role in my life. I guess you could say I’ve had intimate relationships with trees. If I had to name a favorite species it probably would be the Burr Oak or Quercus macrocarpa. My grandparents had a large Burr Oak on the side of the driveway of their house. My grandfather was not fond of the giant acorns that fell on the driveway and in the grass where he was to mow. I remember being very frightened during a terrible wind storm, thinking that huge tree was going to fall on the house. When we awoke the next morning there were many trees that had been broken and even uprooted during the night, but not the mighty burr oak. The last time I walked past that house the tree was still there. At our old house in town we had two large burr oaks between our house and our neighbors. When the acorns fell on the roof, right above our bedroom, it could be disruptive to sleep but we because accustomed to it. We took a family Christmas photo by those trees in 1984 and again with our family in the same spot 15 years later. My husband wore the same sweater in both photos. It was amazing how much those trees had grown in girth in 15 years.  I am guessing these two trees were offspring of a burr oak in the parkway around the corner from that house. This tree was so large that two people with outstretched arms could not span it’s girth. Local lore said that tree was planted on the day Abraham Lincoln died; however, a friend of ours who is a retired biology teacher said it has to be much older than that, probably 350 years. It’s span is enormous.

I remember a maple tree on the edge of the woods behind the house where I grew up. It was a friendly tree with low branches that were great for climbing. My grandparents also had a lovely maple tree that shaded their porch and was also a good climber. My grandfather did not want us to climb that tree. It was so tempting because there was a perfect branch for getting started on the climb. I don’t know what he thought we were going to do to the tree. It was more likely we would come to harm instead of the tree. Maples are lovely too although there can be too many of them and they tend to take over in the woods around us. What child or adult isn’t charmed by the whirligig seed pods.

When I was a student in Denmark I loved the beech woods. I didn’t know any beech trees until that time. They provide very heavy shade so the small woods with these trees have little undergrowth except in the spring when I found the woods floors carpeted with white anemone. It was like something out of a fairy tale and I’ll never forget it. I loved the beech trees so much that I was given a present of 3 beech trees to take home to Illinois. They were small trees, and carefully packaged by Tante and Onkel and presented to me with a fair amount of pomp. I knew I was not supposed to bring living trees into the US but since these were a gift from people I loved, I could not refuse. So I took them on the plane and when the customs forms came around I declared that I did have 3 trees with me. I fully expected them to be confiscated but they were not. I planted them on my parent’s property and my dad put little fences around them. They lasted for a while but the cold winters here eventually killed them.

My dad really loved trees and my mom does too. Their property looks like a park with a wide variety of trees, some that were there naturally and many others that they planted. My dad kept a tree journal of the planting, fertilizing, and pruning of the trees. As a wood turner he was able to use wood from some of the trees that had to be removed. We have bowls and lamps made from some of these trees. My father taught my husband to turn wood so the legacy goes on. We have quite a collection of logs in our garage and basement, much of it from our own woods or the woods of neighbors. My husband marks the end of the log with the name of the property and date of collection.

Probably my favorite tree on the family homestead is a holly tree. This holly tree is a grandchild of a tree from my great grandparent’s home in southern Illinois. My grandmother took a cutting from that tree and grew an offspring in her yard. My parents got one started on their property so that is the grandchild. Holly doesn’t grow very large in Illinois, probably because of our harsh winters, so it is unusual to see one this large.

My parents belonged to an organization The International Wood Collectors Society. They went to wood conventions. Some of the people just collect samples of wood and study different types of wood. They don’t necessarily do anything with the wood other than preserve, study and collect it.

From their website: “Founded in 1947, the International Wood Collectors Society is a non-profit Society devoted to distributing information on collecting wood, correctly identifying and naming wood specimens, and using wood in creative crafts.

People from all countries around the world are invited to
join IWCS, enjoy the benefits of membership and discover more about nature's wonder material -- wood! Collecting wood and/or using wood creatively has to be one of the most unique hobby interests that you could ever pick. IWCS members around the world have formed a network for information exchange and mutual assistance.”

Isn’t that amazing! I society dedicated to wood.

My favorite tree right now is the Red oak that stands at the edge of our porch. Despite it being somewhat of a nuisance when acorns fall in abundance, ricocheting off the porch roof and deck, it is like a friend with its shade over the porch and as a haven for birds and squirrels. Every few years we have a certified arborist come to prune and sometimes remove our trees. Anyone can hack down a tree but if you value trees you need someone who really knows their stuff.

I could go on about trees for a while as more and more come into my head but let’s close with a favorite quote by John Muir.

Any fool can destroy trees. They cannot run away; and if they could, they would still be destroyed -- chased and hunted down as long as fun or a dollar could be got out of their bark hides, branching horns, or magnificent bole backbones. Few that fell trees plant them; nor would planting avail much towards getting back anything like the noble primeval forests. ... It took more than three thousand years to make some of the trees in these Western woods -- trees that are still standing in perfect strength and beauty, waving and singing in the mighty forests of the Sierra. Through all the wonderful, eventful centuries ... God has cared for these trees, saved them from drought, disease, avalanches, and a thousand straining, leveling tempests and floods; but he cannot save them from fools -- only Uncle Sam can do that. --John Muir- Our National Parks (1901) chapter 10.

Needle Notes


US 0 (2.0 mm) Knitter’s Pride Cubics (wood)

Calligraphy Cardigan by Hannah Fettig



Quince & Co Chickadee Leek Colorway

Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in a while, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.
- Muir quoted by Samuel Hall Young in
Alaska Days with John Muir (1915) chapter 7

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Episode 251 Fall Retreat Information


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co all of our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA. Through the month of May Knitting Pipeline listeners may use the code Pipeline10 for 10% off your order. One per customer, please.  www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.

Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. Our gradients work up into beautiful and satisfying projects. Luxury yarn (choose your base), pre-wound into a cake for your convenience.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. If you visit my blog prior to purchasing a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline





Events

Stitches Midwest! Join us!

Sight is Life

Shared by Kathy KISis4knitting

Actually Knitting PALKAL

CuriousHandmade The Shawl Society

Download Registration Form here.

Knitting Pipeline Eagle Crest Fall Retreat 2016
With Workshop by Amy Detjen, Knitting Author, Designer, Teacher, and of KnitCircus Yarns and Podcast
October 19-22, 2016

Eagle Crest Camp and Retreat Center (A Ministry of the Salvation Army) is located in rural Washburn IL, along the hilly bluffs of the Illinois River. This beautiful natural setting will be especially gorgeous in mid-October, our prime color season in Central Illinois. It is easily accessible by car, about a 30 min drive from Washington IL or Peoria. The address is 823 Columbia Rd, Washburn IL 61570.

·        Arrive Wednesday October 19 (check in time 3-5 PM)

·        Check out by 10 am Saturday, October 22, 2016

 

Single Occupancy             $420.00

Double Occupancy (will have your own bed)           $320.00

 

Includes:

·        3 nights lodging in Heartland Lodge at Eagle Crest. Rooms are motel-style with private bath.

·        All meals from Wednesday dinner through Saturday breakfast.

·        Workshop with Amy Detjen on Friday and casual time with Amy from Thursday to Sat morning.

·        Small, intimate retreat with lots of one-on-one time with Paula, Bronwyn, Sarah, and Amy Detjen.

·        Your own Knitting Pipeline Retreat Bag

 

Hosted by Paula Emons-Fuessle

Knitting Pipeline Podcast www.knittingpipeline.com

Paulaef@aol.com                           PrairiePiper on Ravelry

 

To Register:

·        Fill out the registration form and postmark no earlier than Monday June 20, 2016. Registrations will be accepted after this time pending space availability. I will confirm registration by email and on Ravelry by July 15, 2016. Deposits are due August  15, 2016.

·        Full payment is due by October 1, 2016. Checks may not be cashed immediately so don't worry if your check has not cleared.

 

 

 

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Episode 250 Super Heroes!

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co all of our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA. Through the month of May Knitting Pipeline listeners may use the code Pipeline10 for 10% off your order. One per customer, please.  www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.

Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. Our gradients work up into beautiful and satisfying projects. Luxury yarn (choose your base), pre-wound into a cake for your convenience.
"Bite" into our juicy Watermelon yarn cake and be transported to the sunny days of summer. www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. Please use the link in the sidebar before placing a supply order or class. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Bronwyn and Sarah joined me today. We have some Needle Notes, A Pipeliner Question, and lots of Blether.

Needle Notes

Bronwyn

Ami Ami Kittens by Mitsuki Hoshi. Harper Collins

He Loves Me by Bronwyn Hahn

Windswept Forest Cowl to be published soon.

Sarah

Mad Mini Wrap by Sharyn Anhalt





Wild Goose Shawlette by Paula Emons-Fuessle (Sarah is the model in the pattern)

From KnittingDaddy, Greg, of Unraveling Podcast:

Hi, Paula! If you could have any superhero power, what would it be? And why?

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Episode 249 Maine Retreat Info and Q & A


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.
At Quince & Co all of our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA. 

Through the month of May Knitting Pipeline listeners may use the code Pipeline10 for 10% off your order. One per customer, please.  www.quinceandco.com.


Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.
Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. Our gradients work up into beautiful and satisfying projects. "Bite" into our juicy Watermelon yarn cake and be transported to the sunny days of summer. www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. If you visit my blog prior to purchasing a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

Instagram: knittingpipeline

Twitter: knittingline




Pipeliner Notes

Thanks to everyone who has been in touch with me recently. Welcome to New Pipeliners who have introduced themselves in the welcome thread or to me in a personal message: AngelLisa from Florida, Gritknits who is Brenda from Seattle, MuddyMoose who is Sally from Alaska, Knitlibris3x3 who is from Historical NE, and amosgw who is Amy from PA.

Thank you all for introducing yourselves and becoming part of the Knitting Pipeline Community on Ravelry.

I appreciate your reviews and star ratings on iTunes.


One of the questions was about closing the gap when picking up sleeve stitches on a raglan sweater. This is the same technique you can use to close the gap on socks when you transition from picking up the sleeves along the heel flap to the instep stitches. The hole is often called a "pig's eye".

Tutorial on Closing the Gap on Socks (or Sleeves)


Events

Maine and Cornerstone Retreats

Maine Sept 18-22 Registration opens May 14-16 and beyond.


Nature Notes

Last week I totally misspoke when I mentioned the difference between the juvenile male Cardinals and the mature males. You birders were too kind to mention it. It is the juvenile male that has the dark, almost black beak and it turns red later on.

Hummingbirds are here in greater numbers now. The woods are filling in even more. We’ve had a lot of rain and the leaves look almost iridescent at times. The barred owls are very busy these days. One night they were right outside our bedroom window, several of them with their barking sound. It is somewhat frustrating to know they are right there but not be able to see them in the dark. Then suddenly they are gone and you don’t hear them fly at all due to their special feathers.

Other bird sightings this week are Indigo Bunting, more Grosbeaks, both male and female, House wren singing all day which I love, and bluebirds.

A Prayer in Spring by Robert Frost

Needle Notes

Calligraphy Cardigan by Hannah Fettig

Socks in Dancing Dog Dyeworks

Keeping track of rows tutorial.




Custom Socks: Knit to fit your Feet by Kate Atherley

Giveaway! Custom Socks: Knit to Fit your Feet DVD.

Winner is #9 Aizome!

Birthday Box of Socks


New needles: Knitter’s Pride Cubics size 0 dpns

Sock heel formula

·        Flap is on half the stitches. Knit this flap to be a square.

·        Mark middle of heel flap

·        Sl 1. knit to middle, sm, knit 2 (or 3) SSK, K1 Turn

·        Sl 1, purl to middle, sm, purl 2, P2 Tog, P1, Turn

·        Knit to gap, close gap with SSK, k1, turn.

·        Continue in pattern until there are no more gaps.

In The Piping Circle

Funeral last week…locked myself in the car. I was an hour from home…

In The Pipeline

Reading

Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen 2016

The Cabin at Singing River by Chris Czajkowski

Watching

Madame Secretary

Grantchester

Far from the Madding Crowd (movie)



Special! 10% off your Quince & Co order through May 31, 2016 with code Pipeline10. One per customer, please.
Haste ye back!

About Me

My Photo
I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.