Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger Home Business and Quince & Co.

Friday, November 21, 2014

Episode 189 One Year Later


Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer.  Try a different browser like Safari.  Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by my Longaberger Home Business and Quince & Co. I am also a Craftsy Affiliate. This means that if you click from the Craftsy ad on my website and purchase a class and/or materials, I receive credit for it. It is an easy way to support the show. Thank you!
You can also find me here:
Pipeliner Notes
NHknits, a new audio cast.
From ThisHandmadelife who is Olivia
Hey Paula.. just caught up with the latest episode. I’m also a fan of MC Beaton books and maybe you know or don’t but Agatha Raisin is currently filming. It will probably be out in the UK first but it should be on tv by december.
Her eponymous blog is at This Handmade Life.
Events and Announcements
Spring Retreat March 13-14. (with March 12 as optional Yarn Crawl Fun Day). Registration will be opening up Jan 2 (information out in early December)
Mitten KAL FO Prize Thread  Here are the prize winners!

3 Free patterns from Brenda Castiel.

Brenda Castiel Code PODCAST (not case sensitive) for 25% valid until Dec 31, 2014.
Mittens from AthertonGirl and Prairiegl

Thanks to everyone who has donated mittens to The Maine Mitten Project or Threads Hope and Love!
Balsam Hollow available as individual pattern after Nov 22.
Green Gables kit from Little Skein in the Big Wool on Etsy
Knitvent 2014 by Helen Stewart of Curious Handmade
Coupon code is KP25 and that is for 25% off both knitvent 2014 and last year 2013.
To enter for the giveaway leave a comment in thread here by Dec 2, 2014.
The collection is 5 patterns, each with at least 2 sizes or variations. Patterns are being released each Tuesday and two out so far (Candlelit Shawl and Lind Cowl)



Nature Notes
Our temperatures have been unusually low for November. It has been as low as 9 degrees F and then a high of 23 or so during the day. We also had a little snow but just a dusting. Our first real snowfall, that is one that means getting out a shovel, is usually early December. We are seeing more birds at the feeders…cardinals, blue jays, nuthatches, tufted titmice, downey and hairy woodpeckers, and the goldfinches, now completely in their winter garb. I saw a goldfinch a week or two ago that still had quite a bit of bright yellow plumage and I wondered why he was so much later in moulting than the rest of the flock. Speaking of flocks, the cardinals are starting to band together in small flocks that will turn into rather large flocks. In the summer we would see a pair of cardinals occasionally at the feeder but now there are often a few males and a female or two. I’ve been seeing our resident Cooper’s Hawk every day. I’m hoping he is catching some of the small animals such as voles that we’ve seen. That is vole with a v. I had no idea there were so many varieties of voles until I looked it up. I’m not too fond of them, or any rodent for that matter, but as long as they stay outside and don’t get out of control, we can live with it. Perhaps our Barred Owls are helping out as well.
November comes
And November goes,
With the last red berries
And the first white snows.
 
With night coming early,
And dawn coming late,
And ice in the bucket
And frost by the gate.
 
The fires burn
And the kettles sing,
And earth sinks to rest
Until next spring."
-  Elizabeth Coatsworth
Needle Notes
Maaema Scarf by Denise Bell
One mistake I made was using my heavy metal Dyakcraft needles. These were not the appropriate needles for the project.
The Blethering Room
We just passed the one year anniversary of the EF-4 tornado that went through our town of Washington IL on November 17, 2013. There have been church services, community gatherings, and lots of news coverage. Some of you told me you saw some of the news reports. I looked back at the photos I took that day and in the weeks following and am still shocked when I see the devastation. A photo I posted on Instagram is one I took of the approaching tornado as we were driving home from church. I had not noticed that the clock on the car dash reads 10:58 AM. The tornado struck 7 minutes later at 11:05 AM. Although our home was not damaged at all my 91 year old mother-in-law lost her home, one of over 1,000 homes that were severely or completely damaged, probably ¼ of the town.
So what does Washington look like today? I am thrilled and amazed to say that much is back to the new normal. We’ve been told that 75% of recovery has happened but there is still a lot to do. Folks such as imripple in our group have moved into new homes and are going to be celebrating the holidays there. My mother in-law’s duplex has since been rebuilt and sold to a new owner and she is settled into assisted living. Many will be moving into their new homes or repaired homes in Jan or Feb 2015. There are some people who were so traumatized by the tornado that they do not want to rebuild their homes in the same place. The city and park district have planted trees to replace many that were lost and it will be a long time before mature trees fill in the bare spots. Some of you have knitted ornaments to help Kim (naneeknitter) in her effort to replace trees in our area because Washington was not the only town that sustained damage. I want to thank all of you who have supported us your monetary gifts, hands on work, and most of all your words of encouragement, prayers and love. We already loved living here in Washington and are so glad we raised our children here. Because of what we have gone through together with our friends and family we now feel even more attached to this place and the people here.
Product Notes
Stashbot by Hannah Fettig—Thumbs up!
StashBot is a yarn shopping companion: if someone finds a yarn they can’t live without, the app will help them determine how much to buy.  All of the yardage and meter requirements are averages based on our own research and calculations.  It is our hope that with this app in hand, knitters can be saved from over purchasing, while still buying enough to knit the projects they would like.
This first version requires an iPhone or iPod Touch to run (it will also technically run on an iPad, but the user interface isn’t iPad-optimized yet). In the future we’d love to do an Android version too, but as of today we’ve only made the iOS version.
Currently working on Android product. Sign up for mailing list so you will be notified when it is released.
You can choose to view yarn requirements in YARDS or METERS. 
Garment categories include:
  • VESTS, SHRUGS & cropped, average and tunic-length SWEATERS in sizes 3 months - 60” / 152cm bust circumference
  • HATS, SOCKS & MITTENS in sizes baby, toddler, child, adult & XL adult
  • NECKWEAR such as scarves and cowls in three average dimensions
$4.99—this app will pay for itself the next time you visit your local yarn shop, go to a fiber festival, or
Have a great week, haste ye back, and hold your knitting close.

Friday, November 7, 2014

Episode 188 Magic Cake to the Rescue

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer.  Try a different browser like Safari.  Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by my Longaberger Home Business and Quince & Co. I am also a Craftsy Affiliate. This means that if you click from the Craftsy ad on my website and purchase a class and/or materials, I receive credit for it. It is an easy way to support the show. Thank you!
You can find my Longaberger Home Business at www.longaberger.com/paula.

You can also find me here:

Pipeliner Notes
Graceful Pullover by Maria Yarley is a fundraiser pattern for a young women who lost her husband and is now a single mother of 4 young children. 100% of the post-paypal/printing proceeds will go to Bekah and her family.

From Maria: Proceeds from the pattern will be given to Bekah on a monthly basis, and will be handled quietly and legally by means of the church that she and I both attend.
Scams happen, and for that reason I’m including a link to the annoucement our church published (http://sgcapex.org/michael-marshall).

From Sonya:
Hi Paula, 

My name is Sonya, and I have just come across your podcast, which I am enjoying thoroughly (I am starting from episode 1).
About a year ago I began knitting a gorgeous shawl called the Snowdrop Shawl by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee. It was my first attempt at lace, but not being a beginner knitter I confidently (dare I say arrogantly) began. It immediately put me in my place and for every row I knitted correctly there were 5 I had to tink back. Needless to say I retired the shawl in frustration and there it lay until I began listening to your podcast. You gave me the appetite to try it again, 
Well…. Nothing has changed. I keep losing yo’s/stitches and need to tink back to where everything looks manageable. However, I will NOT give up. It cannot beat me.
Thank you so much for the tips on marking the charts. I had marked mine in ink with a great deal of notations which only served to make the chart more difficult to follow. 
Sorry for the long moan. I just needed to vent to someone with patience. You sound very understanding. 
Again. I love your podcast. Thank you.

I wrote:

Hi Sonya,

I feel your frustration. I’m glad the information on charts was helpful. I hope you don’t mind my being perfectly frank here but I just looked at the Snowdrop Shawl and it would be challenge for me. We all get into a project now and then that is either over our heads or just not our cup of tea. I have frogged projects when I am not enjoying the process. Please don’t feel that you HAVE to finish the shawl. It might be the right project later on but just not now. Choose some simpler lace projects and get some satisfaction of completing them first and then tackle the more complicated lace. I admire your tenacity but knitting is supposed to be enjoyable! In one of the early episodes I talked about easy shawl projects for beginning knitters. Not to toot my own horn, but try Piper’s Journey if you have not already done so. ;) Great to hear from you!

Paula

Events and Announcements



I’ll be on the Live show on Nov 13, 2014. Listener dial-in number is: (347) 539-5589.

Spring Retreat March 13-14. (with March 12 as optional Yarn Crawl Fun Day). Registration will be opening up soon.


Mitten KAL FO Prize Thread through Nov 15, 2015.

·        Project bag by Prairie Bag Works. I bought a Prairie Bags Works Bag in Maine and I am really enjoying it. Check out their shop! There is a botanical bird print bag there!

·        Votter fra Eventyrskogen  (mittens from Enchanted woods) or fairytale woods. Mitten e-book by toriot and other Norwegian Designers and bloggers

·        3 Free patterns from Brenda Castiel.

For Brenda Castiel Designs: Code PODCAST (not case sensitive) for 25% valid until Dec 31, 2014.

Knit any mittens, for yourself or others. Keep for your family or donate to charity.

If you want to donate to Threads Hope and Love please send to me at

 PO Box 549,  Washington IL 61571

Tag for mittens on IG and Twitter is #kpmittkal.

#annealong on Instagram and Twitter
Balsam Hollow and Green Gables kit from Little Skein in the Big Wool on Etsy

Nature Notes
We’ve had a few frosts now and the basil, zinnias, and sweet potato vine are brown and withered. I can still harvest chives, parsley, thyme, and rosemary in the herb garden. Before taking out our two heirloom tomato plants we harvested all the green tomatoes and brought them into the garage. I’ve had to throw about half of them out due to mold or other issues but we are still eating tomatoes. The flavor is definitely not the same for these fruits that have ripened off the vine but they are still ok.
The squirrels are busy collecting acorns and burying them for what we hear is an upcoming snowy winter. There’s a squirrel perched on the deck right now with an acorn in his paws. This acorn and many others came from the mighty red oak that stands next to the house, at the corner of the porch. This tree is probably too close for most homeowners as a large branch hangs over the porch. We coddle this tree as best we can. It is forked down low with two large trunks. We clean out the debris that settles in the fork so it doesn’t rot and weaken the two trunks.  We do our best to humanely discourage chipmunks and moles from burrowing underneath our oak tree. We tolerate the acorns all over the deck as well as the alarming sounds of acorns bouncing off the porch skylights and roof.  The ricochet sounds only last for a few weeks.  We are rewarded by shade over the porch during the summer, a close view of our hanging feeder with safflower seeds, and a parade of birds such as nuthatches and woodpeckers that bury seeds or look for insects in the crevices of the bark. We feel our tree is worth a little danger to the home and inconvenience. I am grateful that the acorns are no longer bouncing off the skylights on the roof of the sun porch. That can be quite a racket.

Our nature quote today was shared with me by actionhadley on Ravelry. Thank you, Hadley!

Green was the silence, wet was the light, the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”
 – Pablo Neruda

Needle Notes



Tan House Brook Shawl by Jennifer Lassonde





Tubularity by Martina Behm

PrairiePiper’s Tubularity –Magic Cake Style!

Mittens!
When you are knitting mittens be sure to leave a little extra room at the top of the hand and also on the thumb. It’s a bit like the way you want your shoe to fit, with some pinch room at the top. You will want perhaps a finger’s width or about 1/2”. If your fingers are bumping into the top of the mitten it isn’t very comfortable. Also, wool mittens will tend to shrink a little over time so having some extra room at the top of the mitten will ensure longer wear.

Email from Pearlsgrand:
Dear Paula,  I would like to suggest another book for knitted mittens. Folk Mittens: Techniques and Patterns for Handknitted Mittens by Marcia Lewandowski. The patterns are categorized by regions of the world and include a basic mitten pattern.  Thank you for your wonderful podcast.  Kay
pearlsgrand on Ravelry.


In The Pipeline

Reading
The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivy 3.5 stars
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon YA, easy read. Funny and poignant at the same time.  Allows the reader into the mind of a 15 year old autistic boy. 4.5 stars
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. I’ve never read a book quite like this one. Family secrets as Barb and Tracie of the 2 Knit Lit Chicks would say. 4.5 stars
Two Rivers by T. Greenwood  Well written. Chapters alternated between past and present. One of the main characters is already deceased when the reader comes into the story. 4 stars
Full Hearts and Empty Bellies: A 1920s Childhood from the Forest of Dean to the Streets of London by Winifred Foley. Memoir/coming of age. Very honest and open.  5 stars
Agatha Raisin and The Perfect Paragon. Agatha Raisin Mysteries in order.
Plain Murder by Emma Miller.  Amish PA cozy mystery

Eating

Have a great week, haste ye back, and hold your knitting close.

Friday, October 31, 2014

Episode 187 Cornerstone Inn Fall Retreat Recap

The Cornerstone Inn Pipeliners

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer.  Try a different browser like Safari.  Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by my Longaberger Home Business and Quince & Co. I am also a Craftsy Affiliate. This means that if you click from the Craftsy ad on my website and purchase a class and/or materials, I receive credit for it. It is an easy way to support the show. I can tell that many of you have supported me through Craftsy especially since I’ve been mentioning it on the show. Thank you!
You can also find me here:
Events

Winner of Project bag is Candlefun (#107) who said her favorite colorway was Seraphina.

Events
Knit any mittens, for yourself or others. Keep for your family or donate to charity.
If you want to donate to Threads Hope and Love please send to me at:
 PO Box 549,  Washington IL 61571
Tag for mittens on Instgram and Twitter is #kpmittkal.
Join the #annealong on Instagram and Twitter
Balsam Hollow and Green Gables kit from Little Skein in the Big Wool on Etsy 

Cornerstone Inn Retreat Recap

#kpcornerstone

I do not have time to link everything. Notes are in order that they were mentioned on the show.
Group 1: Tracey aka fun4tracey, Becky aka Hybridgirl
Group 2: Kathy aka Kisforknitting, Barbara aks SFCmarmara

Mittens for Threads, Hope, and Love

Thank you, JudyintheDyes and mmlt!

Beautiful Mittens headed for Threads, Hope, and Love

Mittens for Threads Hope and Love



Mitten Delivery Posse

  • Madison’s on The Square
  • Bernardi’s
  • Jan’s Retro Trunk Show
  • Barbara tried on vintage knitted dress presented by Jan.
    The Clincher
  • Ogle Designs Gradient Coloration
    Group 3: Lynn aka Knitlynn, Kelley aka Kellpatt, KarenE1969
Coffee break at Eli's 

Judy, Lynn, Becky at Eli's
Knitting at my house. Karen, Julie, and Karen E.
It was a gorgeous day on the deck!

Thank you, Door Prize Donors!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Episode 186 Mittens are the New Socks

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer.  Try a different browser like Safari.  Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by my Longaberger Home Business and Quince & Co. I am also a Craftsy Affiliate. This means that if you click from the Craftsy ad on my website and purchase a class and/or materials, I receive credit for it. It is an easy way to support the show. Thank you!

Quince & Co wool yarns are sourced and spun in the US. Known in the trade as "territory wool," our wool comes from Merino, Rambouillet, and Columbia-based sheep that roam the ranges of Montana and Wyoming. All our wool and wool-blend yarns are spun in New England mills with venerable histories. By sourcing our wool in the US and manufacturing our yarn locally, we minimize our carbon footprint. Find Quince wool and the other Quince fibers at www.quinceandco.com.
You can find my Longaberger Home Business at www.longaberger.com/paula.
You can also find me here:

Knitting Pipeline Ravelry Group


Pipeliner Notes

Kickstarter Giveaway Thread is here. October 29 deadline. Leave a comment in the thread about your favorite colorway from Twist Fiber Studio.



Events

Knitting Pipeline Cornerstone Inn Retreat October 22-25 2015



Knit any mittens, for yourself or others. Keep for your family or donate to charity.

If you want to donate to Threads Hope and Love please send to me at

 PO Box 549,  Washington IL 61571

Tag for mittens on Instgram and Twitter is #kpmittkal.

Join the  #annealong on Instagram and Twitter

Balsam Hollow and Green Gables kit from Little Skein in the Big Wool on Etsy


Nature Notes

We are in full fall mode here in Central Illinois. It’s a little chilly in the house this morning. I’m sitting on the porch with my Esjan shawl by Stephen West wrapped around me. The summer clothes can be safely put away now. We’ve had some warm days with temperatures about 80 but it was only for a short time around midday. Some of the plants in our garden show signs of cold weather damage. I’ve been covering up the Sweet Basil even when the temperature at night is in the 40’s. You don’t need freezing temperatures to blacken basil. I’ve been growing basil for 30 years and have tried many varieties, some of them a little strange such as chocolate basil and licorice basil. My tried and true is plain old Sweet Basil. Although there are many cultivars I try to get the most basic of basils for the garden as the flavor seems to be the best. This year I waited too long and was only able to get one Sweet Basil plant at the nursery. I purchased another cultivar which was also labeled Sweet Basil but had very small leaves. It is interesting to note that this plant with the smaller leaves (sorry I’ve lost the tag) is less susceptible to cold weather than it’s big leafed neighbor. I have not bothered to cover this plant at all and the leaves only have the occasional spot of black from the cold. The downside is that the smaller leaves are not as fragrant or taste as the large leaves.

The word basil comes from the Greek βασιλεύς (basileus), meaning "king",[6] as it has come to be associated with the Feast of the Cross commemorating the finding of the True Cross by St Helena mother of the emperor St. Constantine.[7] Alternatively the herbalist John Gerard noted of basil that those stung by scorpions would feel no pain if they ate of basil.[8] and Nicholas Culpeper notes of basil that it is "a herb of Mars and under the Scorpion, and therefore called Basilicon",[9] relating it to basilisk. The Oxford English Dictionary quotes speculations that basil may have been used in "some royal unguent, bath, or medicine". Basil is still considered the "king of herbs" by many cookery authors.[10]

I agree with the latter statement. Basil is probably my favorite herb for seasoning and I’ll be sad when I cannot walk a few steps outside my door to pick some basil.

Last night, October 8, 2014 there was a big show in the sky. There was a lunar eclipse with what they called Blood Moon because the moon appeared to be red, or rather orange red. There are loads of photos online right now and it was quite spectacular. I saw it through the trees from the comfort of the bedroom around 4 am. I could barely make out through the leaves that the eclipse was in progress. The moon appeared to be normal in color. That will have to suffice for me as I didn’t get outside early enough to see it this morning. Bronwyn, Missy, Pat and I were texting back and forth last night. Bronwyn recalled the solar eclipse in 1994 or 95 and how the shadows of the leaves were unusual. That is what I remember best about that eclipse as well. I was standing under the trees in our front yard and the shadows of the leaves looked like crescents. I still don’t understand why the shadows changed although I did read an explanation of it at the time. I probably took photos but if I go looking for them I’m sure I will get distracted and end up spending several hours looking at old photos.

Our quote today is from one my favorite nature writers, Edwin Way Teale.

For man, autumn is a time of harvest, of gathering together.
For nature, it is a time of sowing, of scattering abroad.”
~ Edwin Way Teale
Needle Notes

I finished my Opal Sock Bunny from the workshop by Susan B Anderson at the Knitting Pipeline Maine Retreat. He’s pretty cute. Once I set my mind on finishing him it didn’t take that long.



Susan has come up with techniques so there is very little finishing work and you don’t have to figure out how to place the appendages. I like that so much!

Mittens!
Why knit mittens?
These are some of the reasons that people gave for sock knitting on our board. I think these apply to mittens as well as socks.

  • Mittens are portable. You can memorize a basic pattern and knit it without having to pay too much attention.
  • Mittens can be as easy or as difficult as you like. A beginning knitter can easily make a simple pair of mittens or you can get into more complicated mittens such as Norwegian Selbu Mittens or Latvian mittens with super fine yarn.
  • Mittens are great stashbusters for single and partial skeins of worsted weight.
  • They will fit someone. Your gauge might be off a bit but someone will be able to wear it.
  • Knitting mittens connects us with the past and with knitters around the world. People have been wearing mittens or some form of handwear for centuries. And people have been knitting mittens for centuries.

I like to knit mittens on dpn’s. I have used Magic Loop and its  fine but mittens for me lend themselves to dpns. Many mitten patterns are written for use on dpns but experienced Magic Loopers can convert.

Kathleen Kibblehouse Sweetart77 on Rav



Susan’s probably created a run on Noro with her Noro striped mittens with blog post A Pair and A Spare.

My friend Missy and I are on yarn diets. I suggested that she use the Magic Cake with scraps of worsted weight for mittens. So here’s how you could do it.
  • You will need 60 to 70 g of worsted weight yarn for an adult mitten.
  • I would probably find 30 to 40 g for a main color and then use any scraps for the other color. Then if the scraps are not coherent the mittens will still look like a pair.
  • Gather up worsted scraps and splice them together using the Felted Join or Double Knot.  I would probably prefer a Felted Join when possible because the colors would transition a little more smoothly.
  • Alternate 2 rows of MC with 2 rows of Magic Cake. You could knit the thumb in a solid color. You will need about 5 g for each thumb. Wouldn’t it be cute if the thumbs were different colors?
What are you waiting for? Go get Susan B Andersons Waiting for Winter Mittens pattern and cast on!

Favorite Mittens by Robin Hansen 2006
From Torirot:
Hi
I was listening to you podcast, and it was interesting that you mentioned “the mitten day”, October 14th. This day was known in Norway to be the first day of winter. This was marked on the “primstav”, the wooden stave they used as a calendar.The symbol for this day was often a mitten. They say this has nothing to do with the fact that you need mittens for winter, the symbol is suppposed to be a bishop’s glove (sometimes a bishop’s hat) to remind of some catholic saint. But anyway, we who like knitting mittens, we can interpret that as we like.
It was also fun to hear because I will be releasing a mitten e-book on October 14ht this year. It’s made together with some fellow Norwegian knitters, bloggers and designers. It will be published in Norwegian on the 14th, and then, as soon as we get the translation ready, also in English.
So I thought I’d ask you if you would be interested in doing a giveaway on your podcast for the e-book later this autumn. The mittens are colourwork mittens, in fingering and sport weight yarn, and there are both children, woman and man’s sizes. One of the mittens is currently beeing knitted as a mystery Kal, see here.

Best regards,
Tori


Have a great week, haste ye back, and hold your knitting close!

About Me

My Photo
I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. To earn my keep I am an Independent Longaberger National Sales Leader. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper.