Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Episode 258 Asana Shawl and WIP Wrangling

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This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co  all our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA.  Our natural fibers wool, linen, alpaca, and mohair are not chemically treated or mixed with petrochemical fibers such as nylon. Enjoy springy goodness in your knitting with www.quinceandco.com.

Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.


Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. We are hosting a Pick Your Gradient Shawl KAL through September 2016.  www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. Please click on the link in the sidebar to visit Craftsy. When you purchase a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

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Events

Welcome to new Moderator, TheaMidnight!

KnitCircus Shawl KAL


Retreat dates and status of retreat registrations are listed in a sticky thread in the Knitting Pipeline Retreats group.

Nature Notes

We are having a good morning of thunderstorms and heavy rain today. Our area is under a flash flood warning. Our creek is overflowing its banks and the rain gardens are full and not really able to handle the excess water. My husband created rain gardens to slow down the flow of water during heavy rains and help prevent erosion down the hill. A rain garden is basically a shallow wide hole that can fill up with rain water and slowly drain. You can add plants to it so the root systems help hold the dirt and sand in place too.

Butterflies have been busy on the zinnia bed out front. We aren’t seeing the larger butterflies as much now—giant swallowtail, pipevine, spicebush, and black. We still have Eastern Tiger Swallowtails. I started putting together a little video to help me remember how to identify the different swallowtails that resemble the black swallowtail, mainly pipevine and spicebush and female tiger swallowtail. At first glance you might think all of these are the black swallowtail. My camera lens kept fogging up whenever I went outside to film so I started keeping it in the garage. I need a video to remember myself as I always feel rusty at the beginning of butterfly season.

Yesterday I saw, for the first time at this house, a cloudless sulpher. This is almost twice the size of an orange or yellow sulpher and it has a lime green cast to it’s wings. You will  notice right away that it is larger than the usual yellow butterflies. I did get a pretty good photo so I will post it in the blog but it is hard to understand the size when there is nothing to compare it to. We also have loads of silver spotted skippers, various small skippers, painted ladies, Tiger swallowtail and finally…monarchs. I’ve been very concerned about the monarchs. Last summer the numbers seemed to be up but when it is the end of August and we have not seen any in the garden, I am concerned.

August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time. --Sylvia Plath


Needle Notes


Asana Shawl by Helen Stewart 3rd in The Shawl Society Collection




Seven Sisters Arts Matrika (merino/silk) 2 skeins

The Blethering Room

WIP Wrangling

From KatyKittyJay

I’ve been less enthused by my knitting recently. I’m trying to finish projects because I have too many wips for comfort and never complete anything because my time is divided between so many, and some are big, and others are at the fiddly tedious stage before completion. I think this is why I’m not enjoying it so much, although I’m still knitting every day just not that much and not feeling excited about it.

I didn’t think you could have too many wips but this system is not working for me. Knitting is meant to be fun!

From TheaMidnight

Unfun WIPs can endanger your knitting mojo, so you must guard against that. I look at my WIPs and I question 1) Does the knitting /finishing involve more than I am willing to commit?; 2) Will I still love the piece/garment when I am finished?;
3) How can I reward myself along the way or make this task seem happier until I am done?

Without seeming too philosophical, I am only going to do knitting which I really enjoy. Part of this means forgiving myself for a bad purchase (What was I thinking? LoL!) and being GUILT FREE! I am refusing to punish myself for not finishing and for moving onto another project with a different challenge! There I guess that was some philosophy!

Have the most fun you can with your knitting and don’t let those WIPs drag you under! Move on to knitting you love!

Angelus Novus by East London Knits/Rene Callahan


Quince & Co Phoebe in the Mercury colorway.

Finished body and one sleeve. Sleeve too tight and body too short. I did get gauge and checked gauge several times throughout but did not check row gauge which is probably key in this design.

There comes a time in most projects where you have to power through a section that might not be your favorite type of knitting but I find it is better to do it when you get to it than start something else and try to come back to it. It generally won’t be more fun then.

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.

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I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.