Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Friday, September 30, 2016

Episode 261 Golden Sands and Knitbot Wool Trip Giveaway



Iceland Tour with  Amy Detjen!
May 26-June 5 2017



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This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.



At Quince & Co  all our wool yarns are 100% grown, processed, spun, dyed, twisted, and labeled here in the USA.  Our natural fibers wool, linen, alpaca, and mohair are not chemically treated or mixed with petrochemical fibers such as nylon. Enjoy springy goodness in your knitting with www.quinceandco.com.













Knitcircus celebrates fun, a passion for knitting, and the delight of beautiful yarn.




Treat yourself to a gorgeous, hand-dyed, gradient yarn in saturated colors with smooth color transitions throughout the skein. We are hosting a Pick Your Gradient Shawl KAL through September 2016.  www.knitcircus.com.

Knitting Pipeline is a Craftsy Affiliate. I enjoy taking Craftsy classes and have learned so much while taking them at my own pace. If you visit my blog prior to purchasing a class or supplies I receive credit for it. Thank you!

You can find me on Ravelry as PrairiePiper and on Instagram as KnittingPipeline. There are two groups on Ravelry, Knitting Pipeline and Knitting Pipeline Retreats. Come join us there!

You can also find me here:

Ravelry: PrairiePiper Feel free to include me in your friends.

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Twitter: knittingline




Pipeliner Notes

From itsjustmeghan

Listening to podcast right now and had to stop to share my ball winding experience.
At one of the yarn stores I was learning to knit at, I had a teacher who would not let you wind a cake on the ball wonder unless you were going to knit on it that day. She also insisted that when you did wind, you had to do it twice. Once from skein to cake , then once more from cake to cake . She felt that the swift alone put too much tension on the yarn.
I completely forgot about that story until you started talking about cakes on the podcast! Thanks for the giggle!


From a spinners perspective, I think the concern is the tension on the yarn. People tend to wrap balls by hand or into cakes with lots of tension which will pull the fibers taught. Sitting like that in the cake , the yarn will behave differently and have a different hand. A squishy yard will have less squish.
BUT, as soon as that yarn gets wet/damp/humid, it will reactivated the twist, and the yarn will spring back to a happier place. This is great for socks that stretch, but is not good for a project knit to gauge without washing your swatch. Same things happen to spinners that will hang weights on their skeins while they dry. It’ll make your skeins hang long and straight, but get them wet and over spun yarn will be
overspun again.


So, maybe the double ball winding lady was on to something?!
All in all, be kind to your yarn and it’ll be kind to you!


PA Knitwit (Sarah)

Still listening, but wanted to chime in on the discussion about winding yarn and whether or not it’s damaged by winding too far ahead of time.

As I understood it, the potential issue people were warning about wasn’t so much that the yarn would be damaged by being wound but that, if wound too tight, it could get stretched out. As you noted, Paula, wool does tend to want to go back to its original state, especially when it gets washed; that’s why you have to reblock a lace shawl when you wash it. I think the main concern is that if yarn was wound tightly and left for a long time, thereby getting stretched, then the knitter might get an inaccurate gauge when they swatch for a project. This is another example of why it’s important to wash your swatch in the same way you plan to wash the finished item, as you’ll get a more accurate gauge then when the yarn bounces back.

StacieMakeDo:

I’m confused about your mittens not felting. I’ve made a few felted projects (mittens, hats, slippers) with Lamb’s Pride (15% mohair) and had them felt up just fine. I know I did have to wash the items I made more than once, usually with a towel or a pair of blue jeans or something to help agitation in my He machine.

I knit a lot with Brown Sheep. Much of my stash is their yarn since I’m lucky enough to have relatives to visit near the Factory ;)

Would love an episode on mittens. I’m hoping to get brave enough to attempt some SpillyJanes this year.




KnitBaahPurl

Winners!

Over the Moon: a Sheep’s Tale Winner! #75 Hedgiesyarn from Joanne from New Tripoli PA (book) I would read this book to one of my 9 grandchildren.
Sweet Degrees of Thanks Collection Winner! #70 dkfmom from Donna from Salem VA (notecards) I would read the book to my grandchildren! A couple of them are already interested in knitting!

Sue Wilkins framed 4 notecards.  I have this book and if I won I would donate to my local lubrary for all to enjoy. I also love these cards and wanted to show you what I did with 4 of my favorites to hang in my ‘studio’.



New Giveaway!


 A sweater’s quantity of Hanna’s Wool Trip yarn. Leave a message in the thread Knitbot Wool Trip Giveaway. Tell us a design you have made of Hannah’s or something about the Wool Trip Yarn or Knitbot website.

Hannah at Knitting  Pipeline Maine








Nature Notes

It was a delightfully chilly morning (56 F) this morning as I headed out on my morning walk. Autumn is definitely here—finally—although we will no doubt have a few warm days yet. Acorns are falling on our porch roof and deck. The squirrels are busy caching these for their winter stores.

We’ve been watching the goldfinches to see if their plumage is changing and quite suddenly it seemed that all the male goldfinches were mottled and at least half way into their subdued winter colors. As I write this I am watching them perch on the side of our water feature for a cool drink. Our zinnias are looking pretty shabby but the goldfinches certainly enjoy eating the seeds so we will leave them for a while.

Hummingbirds are still coming to the feeder. I thought the hummingbirds were mostly ones that were traveling through but they still recognize my husband when he takes the feeders out in the morning so perhaps these are the ones we’ve been seeing all summer.

The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

-   John Updike, September



Needle Notes

Hug Me Mug Cozy by Lily Sugar and Cream/Yarnspirations.com





Mods: Mock buttonholes and no ties. Might leave thumbs off mittens.

Peace Fleece

Golden Sand Shawl by Joji Locatelli


Sight is Life group on Ravelry

Quince & Co Tern is a great choice for this design!

The Blethering Room

Polamer, Inc   Personal shipping to Poland. Thank you, Cydh!

In the Piping Circle

9/11 Memorial Walk and Service

Competition is St. Louis.

Honor Flight

Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.



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I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.