Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by my Longaberger home businessn and Quince & Co.

Knitting Pipeline is sponsored by Quince & Co. and Knitcircus Yarns

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Episode 277 Snowmelt and Laveer Kerchief

Listen here or use the Flash Player on this site for current and past episodes. Flash Player is not compatible with Internet Explorer. Try a different browser like Safari. Or jaunt on over to iTunes to find the show there.

This episode is sponsored by Quince & Co and Knitcircus Yarns.

At Quince & Co we are looking ahead to spring and summer knitting. Try out Sparrow, our organic linen in fingering weight for light sweaters, tops, and shawls. Kestrel is our ribbon yarn in organic linen, perfect for drapey worsted weight sweaters.

At Knitcircus Yarns the ever-popular Summer Camp Kit has a new color way, Brass and Sream. This garter triangle shawl, designed by Laura Aylor, is the perfect way to show off a gradient and coordinating speckle! Available Ready to Ship to your front door in Brass and SteamBig Top BirthdayOver the RainbowWatermelonMischief ManagedCindy Lou Who and Mistress of Myself  gradient/speckle pairs. 
 Find us at www.knitcircus.com and be sure to join our Ravelry group and listen to our podcast.

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Pipeliner Notes
Thanks to everyone who has been in touch with me in the past few weeks and for your feedback on the last episode. A special thank you and welcome to new Pipeliners who have introduced yourselves in the Welcome Thread. Deveau in Nova Scotia, knitnaround who is Patty in WI, capeneddicknitter, Amy from ME, tinaSseptember who is tina from NM, kitsala who is Louise in MI (we share a birthday), LizzieBeth who is Lizzie from CA, ringer2 who is Diane from Gurnee IL, nest knitting who is Bea from Montreal, and dstriquet who is Dee from NH and who is friends with retreat attendees Kathy and Sue. Welcome!

Thank you for the reviews and 5 star ratings on iTunes!
BasiCable 3/16
KLnitty01 3/13

From Birchpoint who is Elizabeth:

Hi Paula,
I wanted to ask if you would have any interest in covering the topic of using the “magic knot” method of joining a new ball of yarn. I have been told conflicting things about this method and would really like to know if it is a good method or not (Jane Richmond endorses it but I have read that it shouldn’t be used with super wash wool). I so appreciated your talk about SSK because I had been instructed in the “myth” of those two methods being interchangeable.
Thanks again for the podcast --- I find it enjoyable and informative! However, I cannot understand how you can get all the reading, watching, listening, AND knitting done that you do!!
Happy Knitting, Elizabeth

Answer: I first heard about the double knot from several listeners way back but I wasn’t too interested because I come from the Elizabeth Zimmermann School of no knots EVER. Went on to use it in the Magic Cake Ruffle Shawl which is how I believe it got its nickname Magic Knot.
This is going to be an unpopular opinion because I know that people say the knot will fail with certain yarns but I think it could be user error. If your knots are failing then go back to watch Jane’s video.
Do I use the Magic Knot all the time? No, not at all. When using 100% wool or feltable fibers I generally use the felted join, also known as spit join. I would not use the Magic Knot in socks or close fitting items.  I probably would not use for very bulky yarn although I seldom knit with bulky. Right now I am knitting Helen Stewart’s Twinkle Twinkle blanket and I’m using the Magic Knot for all the joins in the cotton blend. I was watching Dani of Little Bobbins and she was showing her scrappy blankets, both knit and crochet and she said that if it weren’t for the magic knot she wouldn’t be making these scrappy blankets at all because the number of ends to weave in would be a turn off.

From Alfubet who is Pam
Continental vs English

Hi Paula…
I have this burning question that I have been thinking and researching about-continental knitting vs English knitting. I don’t personally know anyone who knits where I live so I thought maybe you could give me your take on this. I’ve always knitted English style, but read different articles saying that continental is faster and easier on the hands. I am trying to learn continental style but have struggled to really find my “groove” as I’m right handed. Is it true that it is faster and less strain on the hands? Do you knit continental or English? I’m sure you’ve been asked this before so forgive me if I’m repeating a common question Thanks so much for your wonderful podcast. I have fibromyalgia/CFS and spend a lot of time at home…your podcast has not only taught me a great deal about knitting but you’ve been a great companion on some pretty bad fibro days! Thanks so much! Blessings for a great 2017!

Answer:
I’m an English knitter that converted to Continental and it came very naturally. I went to Denmark as an exchange student and I had never seen anyone knit that fast. I had no trouble learning it and the economy of motion suits me and my hands. I knew right away that this was right for me. I use both methods when doing colorwork so it does come in handy to know both. I know some English knitters who are very fast and do not seem to have hand strain. If you are not happy with your style of knitting then I would definitely give it a try.
Here’s the paradox: Some of the fastest knitters I have seen are English style; however, if you take the average continental knitter and the average English knitter, continental knitters are faster.
Teaching new knitters…some find one way much more natural than the other. English is probably easier to teach.
For you, Pam, I would say to give it a try and at least you then have the option of switching methods to relieve any pain. Probably best to stick with one method for each project because your gauge might be different.

Events
Georgia Retreat is April 2-6.
Next retreat registration will be Maine in September and that will be my focus as soon as I get back from Georgia.

Icelandic Read Along/Knit Along

Nature Notes
On this very rainy Monday, which is the 3rd rainy day in a row, I am watching the muddy waters of Oak Creek running through our ravine. Our grass is beginning to change from brown to green. Squirrels are foraging around the base of the feeder. It has been a busy time for the birds. Goldfinches have been molting into their summer garb. Mating and territorial calls from the birds are the backdrop of sound in the woods and fields. When I came home from Scotland on March 10 I went to bed to the lullaby of the spring peepers, the frogs that sing their sleigh bell chorus on warm nights. This is one of my favorite nature sounds and I go right to sleep, but then after many hours of travel, I probably could have fallen asleep without any help from frogs.

Bob has been filling the feeders daily and the birds are cleaning it out. We have been putting out blocks of suet so migrating birds can get nourishment for their journeys. Redwing blackbirds have been stopping here but not crowding the feeders very often. We don’t mind as we know they won’t continue here once they establish their territories in the fields and open areas.

Behold, My Friends, The spring is come! The earth has gladly received the embraces of the sun, and we shall soon see the results of their love. -- Sitting Bull.

Needle Notes

Socks: Wearing my Skyp Rib Socks by Adrienne Ku today. Knit Picks Stroll Tonal.

Snowmelt Mystery Shawl by CuriousHandmade
Hue Loco (2) and Tempted
Laveer Kerchief by Curioushandmade
Gift basket and Yarn from The Fiber Co. Luma.
So Just Shop
Baskets and The Fiber Co Luma Yarn at CuriousHandmade Country House Retreat

The Blethering Room
Curious Handmade Country House Retreat
Warm Springs Bath Mitt by BluebeeStudio
Quince & Co Sparrow


Have a great week, haste ye back and hold your knitting close.






















1 comment:

Nancy @ Grace and Peace Quilting said...

Hi Paula! I enjoyed listening to your latest pod and reading through your notes! I always listen twice, to see what else I might learn. Cute baskets from the retreat in the UK! I enjoyed looking through your photos. Sorry you couldn't get any fabrics, but maybe next time!

About Me

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I play the Great Highland Pipes, knit, observe nature, and read. My name on Ravelry is PrairiePiper. Find me on Instagram as KnittingPipeline.